Rosenau, Milton Joseph

Rosenau, Milton Joseph

(1869–1946) epidemiologist; born in Philadelphia. After taking his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania (1889) and studying disease prevention in Europe, he joined the U.S. Public Health Service in 1890, serving as director of its research laboratory (1899–1909). He made notable contributions in several fields, including the study of anaphylaxis, establishing the official unit for diphtheria antitoxin, and studying typhoid fever, malaria, botulism, and various respiratory diseases. In 1906 he defined the process for milk pasteurization. At Harvard Medical School (1909–35) he established the first school for public health officers (1913), inculcated students with vital knowledge about communicable diseases, and published his most important book, Preventive Medicine and Hygiene (1913). At the University of North Carolina: Chapel Hill (1935–45), he established a school of public health.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.