Rosette nebula


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Rosette nebula

(roh-zet ) (NGC 2237-38-39) A large emission nebula, about 1° in diameter, in the constellation Monoceros. It is an H II region heated and ionized by a centrally situated open cluster of hot young stars (NGC 2244).

Rosette Nebula

[rō′zet ′neb·yə·lə]
(astronomy)
A nebula classified as NGC 2237; this nebula contains numerous small dense clouds that have been photographed with large telescopes.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In celebration of Shark Week, NASA released a stunning image of the Rosette Nebula that resembled a great white shark with its mouth open.
Jean's star pic is simply A-gazing AMATEUR astronomer Jean Dean has been recognised by NASA thanks to this stunning picture of the Rosette Nebula, taken from her back garden.
Gahm and colleagues also found some in the Rosette nebula, as reported in the same journal in 2013.
NGC 2237/8/9 in combination with others is known as the Rosette Nebula. It is a large, low surface brightness nebula covered with faint star dust, unfortunately be appreciated to its full only with slightly larger power than binoculars.
The cluster lies in the heart of the Rosette Nebula (NGC 2246), which is often photographed but is a challenge to observe.
The conditions allowed Steve Devine, who lives in Hebburn in South Tyneside, to photograph the Rosette Nebula in the constellation Monoceros, 5,200 light years distant.
The pictures show the exotic Rosette Nebula, some 5,200 light years from Earth.
The Herschel telescope pictures show parts of the Rosette Nebula, which are some 5,200 light years from Earth.
The Rosette Nebula in Monoceros is a star-forming region of gas and dust lit by a cluster of dazzling young blue stars at its center (NGC 2244).
Surrounding NGC 2244 is a dusty cloud of glow more than a degree wide that's elusive (but beautifully so) in telescopes and absolutely stunning in photographs: the Rosette Nebula.
Now, a high-resolution X-ray view of the Rosette nebula, a nearby star-forming region, has revealed for the first time that stellar winds heat surrounding gas to a scorching 6 million kelvins.