Ross, Harold Wallace

Ross, Harold Wallace,

1892–1951, American editor, b. Aspen, Colo. He founded the New Yorker in 1925 and was its influential managing editor until his death. Ross quit school at the age of 14 to work at the Salt Lake City Tribune. During World War I he edited Stars and Stripes in France. From its inception, the New Yorker captured the contemporary scene in features written by such writers as E. B. WhiteWhite, E. B.
(Elwyn Brooks White), 1899–1985, American writer, b. Mt. Vernon, N.Y., grad. Cornell, 1921. A witty, satiric observer of contemporary society, White was a member of the staff of the early New Yorker;
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, Dorothy ParkerParker, Dorothy
(Dorothy Rothschild Parker), 1893–1967, American short-story and verse writer, b. West End, N.J. While serving as drama critic for Vanity Fair (1916–17) and book critic for the New Yorker
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, James ThurberThurber, James,
1894–1961, American humorist, b. Columbus, Ohio, studied at Ohio State Univ. After working on various newspapers he served on the staff of the New Yorker
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, and Wolcott Gibbs, and in cartoons by Peter ArnoArno, Peter
, 1904–68, American cartoonist, b. New York City. Arno's satirical cartoons appeared in the New Yorker from 1925 until his death. He achieved a distinctive drawing style featuring heavily outlined figures.
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 and Charles AddamsAddams, Charles Samuel,
1912–88, American cartoonist, b. Westfield, N.J. Beginning in 1932, Addams's work appeared regularly in the New Yorker, to which he eventually contributed more than 1,300 cartoons.
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See T. Kunkel, ed., Letters from the Editor: The New Yorker's Harold Ross (2000); biography by T. Kunkel (1995); J. Thurber, The Years with Ross (repr. 1982).

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