Rossby wave


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Rossby wave

[′rȯs·bē ‚wāv]
(meteorology)
A large, slow-moving, planetary-scale wave generated in the troposphere by ocean-land temperature contrasts and topographic forcing (winds flowing over mountains), and affected by the Coriolis effect due to the earth's rotation. Rossby waves have also been observed in the ocean. Also known as planetary wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research found that the same large-scale meteorological event - an abnormal Rossby wave - sparked extreme heat and persistent wildfires in Russia as well as unusual downstream wind patterns that shifted rainfall in the Indian monsoon region and fuelled heavy flooding in Pakistan.
The SST anomalies over this region might force oceanic Rossby wave propagation westward and equatorward crossing the oceanic basin, which results in warming SST at the equatorial band.
In the theory of the vertical propagation of planetary waves, Charney and Drazin [33] pointed out that a Rossby wave can only propagate in westerlies.
The prominent Okhotsk high in August 2017 formed in association with the propagation of a stationary Rossby wave in the middle-upper troposphere from Europe through East Siberia (Fig.
Huang, "The Rossby wave as a key mechanism of Indian Ocean climate variability," Deep-Sea Research I, vol.
Furthermore, circulation anomalies as blocking storm tracks and frontal systems (e.g., [21]) are often associated with a large scale stationary Rossby wave pattern Fischer (see [14] and references therein).
2010), tend to upwell the local thermocline and drive westward-propagating cold Rossby waves. During December 2016-February 2017, cold upper-300-m mean temperature anomalies occurred along 10[degrees]S and in the western IO, reminiscent of the Rossby wave activities (Fig.
[52] suggested that a Rossby wave train propagates from northeast of India to Canada in response to SST changes linked to the IOD.
The atmospheric ENSO teleconnection in November and December is reminiscent of the east Atlantic pattern and distinct from the well-known arching extratropical Rossby wave train found from January to March.
[31] found that anomalous convection from El Nino instigates a Rossby wave train in austral winter from the central equatorial Pacific poleward, which is known as the Pacific South American (PSA) pattern [32, 33].
The vortex Rossby wave (VRW) has been proposed to explain the formation of typhoon rainbands (Montgomery and Kallenbach 1997).