Rossby wave

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Rossby wave

[′rȯs·bē ‚wāv]
(meteorology)
A large, slow-moving, planetary-scale wave generated in the troposphere by ocean-land temperature contrasts and topographic forcing (winds flowing over mountains), and affected by the Coriolis effect due to the earth's rotation. Rossby waves have also been observed in the ocean. Also known as planetary wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) shows several inner-core rainbands that likely developed in association with vortex Rossby waves (Abdullah 1966; Montgomery and Kallenbach 1997; Chen and Yau 2001; Corbosiero et al.
Rossby waves are a natural phenomenon in the atmospheres and oceans of planets that form in response to the rotation of the planet.Like Earth, the Sun also rotates and should support Rossby waves, but their existence on the Sun has been debated, until now.
Malanotte-Rizzoli, "Nonlinear stationary Rossby waves on nonuniform zonal winds and atmospheric blocking.
Meanwhile, the Rossby waves theory was widely used in the study of mesoscale eddies and the interaction of large and medium scale motions.
As an example, consider an optimal control problem for the large-scale atmospheric dynamics that is characterized by the slowly moving Rossby waves. These planetary-scale waves strongly influence weather conditions over large geographical regions.
Xu, "Dissipative nonlinear Schrodinger equation for envelope solitary Rossby waves with dissipation effect in stratified fluids and its solution," Abstract and Applied Analysis, vol.
A key part of the coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere occurs through the propagation and breaking of planetary-scale Rossby waves and gravity waves.
For Europa, these forces may also generate internal, resonating Rossby waves that carry a thousand times the energy of frictional dissipation.
These structures can propagate westward at speeds similar to the theoretical propagation speed of Rossby waves and have similar sizes and characteristics.
The propagation speed is largely consistent with that of long Rossby waves reported in the literature of general circulation theory.
The most important advantage of the T-Z explicit large time-step scheme is addressing the issue of fast and slow time scales in SWE by treating the terms associated with the fast gravity-inertia waves on a coarser grid but to a higher accuracy than the terms associated with slow Rossby waves. Neta et al.