Rosso, Medardo

Rosso, Medardo

(mādär`dō rôs`sō), 1858–1928, Italian sculptor. A painter until 1883, he turned to sculpture and worked periodically in Paris but lived mainly in Milan. He was a friend of Degas and Rodin, but he quarreled with the latter in 1898 about which of them had introduced impressionism into sculpture. Rosso showed brilliance in his ability to capture the play of light on a surface. He preferred to work in wax, since the material lends itself to effects of suppleness and fluidity. A characteristic portrait is his Bimbo ebreo (Univ. of Nebraska). In Barzio the Rosso Museum houses much of his work.

Rosso, Medardo

 

Born June 20, 1858, in Turin; died Mar. 31, 1928, in Milan. Italian impressionist sculptor.

Rosso received no formal artistic training. He worked in Milan, in Venice, and—after 1886—mainly in Paris. In his many-figured compositions and his portraits of children, Rosso sought to render the changeability of nature, to impart picturesquely amorphous and fluid qualities, and to achieve softly modeled forms and a texture receptive to light. Rosso often worked in wax. His sculptures include The Golden Age (1886–87, Musée du Petit Palais, Paris), Laughing Girl (1889, Museum of Fine Arts, Leipzig), Motherhood (1889, Municipal Gallery of Modern Art, Turin), and Veiled Woman (1893, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome).

REFERENCES

Borghi, M. Medardo Rosso. Milan, 1950.
Barr, M. S. Medardo Rosso. New York, 1963.
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