rotary dial

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rotary dial

A rotating number selector on early telephones (and TVs). Introduced in the early 1900s, rotary phones were commonly used from the 1920s until the 1960s, when dial phones were gradually replaced with push button phones (see Touch-Tone).


In the Antique Shop
As the caller manually rotated the spring-loaded dial clockwise, it was halted at the finger stop (red arrow). Letting go, the spring automatically reversed the rotation sending a stream of pulses to the telephone company central office (CO). The larger the digit, the more pulses, with 0 generating 10 pulses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rotary phones 6 which feature a round dial with finger holes 6 first emerged in the early 20th century.
I caution the generation they call millennial: When I was your age, I wrote cursive script on paper with pen and dialed a rotary phone. Technological change is perennial.
For example, how was a rotary phone improved upon to get the smartphones we have today?
Before we had touch-tone automation (the IVR technology), there were a few systems designed to recognize the clicks in a rotary phone. Cellular phones were available in the Cy80s, but they were cumbersome and expensive (not just for the phone but for the actual minutes used, too), so most of an advisor's work was conducted at the office.
I went from the rotary phone to Twitter, which was quite a learning curve [laughs].
Of course I will not talk about rotary phone, can opener, videotapes, cassettes, music records and let us not forget the sextant.
We collected typewriters, Walkmans, Discmans, record players, a cannon ball, an ink and quill set, a 1940s radio, an Atari console, an avocado green rotary phone, a Super 8 video camera, and floppy discs.
Flexo, offset and silkscreen printers are not about to go by way of the rotary phone, cassette tapes and the card catalog.
This video explains how to use a rotary phone to make a call.
We went back to a rotary phone, as it doesn't tend to get "fried" during storms.
They invited you to dial your number on an adjacent rotary phone, time it, then compare it to using a push button phone.
My grandparents' dusty, old rotary phone suddenly seemed a lot less obsolete.