Rothamsted

Rothamsted

(rŏth`əmstĭd), world's oldest and England's most important agricultural experiment station, now the main center of the Institute of Arable Crops Research (IACR). It was founded in 1843 by John Bennet LawesLawes, Sir John Bennet,
1814–1900, English agriculturist. He founded the famous experimental farm at Rothamsted, where, with the English chemist Sir J. H. Gilbert, he experimented with plants and animals.
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 on his estate at Harpenden, in Hertfordshire, where he had been experimenting with fertilizers. In 1842 a patent had been granted him for the development of superphosphate—bone meal, or calcium phosphate, treated with sulfuric acid—an artificial fertilizer, which his factory soon produced in large quantities. The station continued experimenting with fertilizers and expanded its activities to include crop-production studies and animal nutrition experiments. Expansions started in 1902 provided new facilities and added to the staff botanists, bacteriologists, chemists, and writers, which increased the value of the station to Great Britain's varied agricultural interests, distributed as they were throughout the world. In 1934 a public appeal brought forth the funds needed to buy the grounds used by the station. The experimental work, which had once been financed entirely by Lawes, came to be sustained by government grants, supplemented by private contributions. In 1987 Rothamsted, the Long Ashton Research Station, and Broom's Barn Experimental Station merged to form the IACR. An important function of the institute now is the training of postgraduate research workers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company was also recently appointed to deliver a new leisure and cultural centre in Harpenden by altering the existing swimming pool building in Rothamsted Park to provide an improved main pool, as well as new 17 metre-long learner pool, a sports hall and a larger gym.
Rothamsted Research director Professor Achim Dobermann welcomed the prospect of a more pragmatic approach to the risk assessment of GM crops, while JHI director Professor Colin Campbell, whose institute relies heavily on Scottish Government funding, said GM and GE had "great potential" to develop crops with biological resistance to pathogens, including blight in potatoes.
The new facility is part of Rothamsted Research's 'farm lab', which measures how sustainable different farming methods are at its North Wyke site near Okehampton, Devon.
The new facility is part of Rothamsted Research's "farm lab", which measures how sustainable different farming methods are at its site near Okehampton, Devon.
Using 50 years worth of observations of UK aphids, moths, butterflies and birds (researchers first began to track these species in earnest in the 1960s), a group of researchers led by Dr James Bell of the Rothamsted Insect Survey, has tried to answer some of these questions.
Dr James Bell, of the Rothamsted Insect Survey, said: "This all points to a complex picture emerging under climate change."
Lead author Dr James Bell, who heads up the Rothamsted Insect Survey, said: "There was already good evidence that spring is coming earlier each year, but what we didn't expect to find was that it was advancing as much in forests as it is in open areas such as grassland.
The European region is estimated to account for the largest share in 2018 due to the strong presence of players such as LemnaTec (Germany), CropDesign - BASF SE (Germany), Heinz Walz (Germany), KeyGene (Netherlands), and Rothamsted Research (UK), which provide quality services to meet the research requirements of plant breeders.
"This will greatly speed up our efforts on identification of agriculturally important wheat genes, including those that would help to combat major fungal diseases," said Kostya Kanyuka a functional genomics scientist at Rothamsted Research.
Working out the right conditions to support those beneficial fungi and identifying the cereal varieties that are best suited to make the most of that help is no mean task, but now a young team of scientists from Rothamsted Research has come up with some answers.
Likewise, Rothamsted Research published a study earlier this year showing that bats are migrating mid-March, two weeks earlier than the customary late March.
If successful, the "proof of concept" study at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden could lead to similar work to boost photosynthesis in other staple crops such as rice and maize.