Rothari


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rothari

 

Born circa A.D. 606; died 652. King of the Lombards from 636.

Rothari waged war against the Byzantines and conquered Liguria (including Genoa in 641) and territory along the Adriatic Sea. In 643 he published his code of civil and criminal law, known as Rothari’s Edict.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rothari's law had no subsequent effect on any ecclesiastical rulings by popes or on any decrees of church synods, but it did influence secular legislation.
A closer parallel to Chapter 176 of Rothari's Edict appeared more than 400 years later in the North German code of customary law called the Sachsenspiegel (Mirror of the Saxons).
Rothari's Edict, Carolingian legislation, the Sachsenspiegel, and Henry of Bracton's commentary on English Common Law either exclude lepers from society and/or impose severe restrictions on their legal rights.
(31) Sternburg, Orientalium more secutus, 170-71 et passim; Rothari's Edict in The Lombard Laws.
In 643, the Lombard king Rothari issued a code of law which, although written in Latin, derived from the old Germanic customary laws of the Lombard tribe.
Nearly six hundred years earlier, Article 353 of Longobard Rothari's Edict had contemplated just such cases: `Si duo porcarii inter se battederint aut scandalum commiserint ...' (if two swineherds come to blows, or cause a rucus ...).(11) The term here (428) is perhaps less surprising than it might be, were it to be applied to modern-day pigs, for the medieval `domestic' pig was hardly distinguishable from a wild boar, and had a very visible coat.(12)
In these respects the ET is similar to other important legal compilations like the Visigothic Breviary of Alaric (506) and the much later Edict of the Lombard king Rothari (643), which together formed a distinctive western legal culture in the aftermath of Rome's demise.