distributor

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distributor

, distributer
1. Commerce a wholesaler or middleman engaged in the distribution of a category of goods, esp to retailers in a specific area
2. the device in a petrol engine that distributes the high-tension voltage to the sparking plugs in the sequence of the firing order
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Distributor

 

a device in the ignition system of a carburetor-type internal-combustion engine that is designed to transmit high-voltage electric current to the spark plugs.

A distributor consists of a low-voltage current interrupter and a high-voltage current distributor, which are driven by an engine camshaft. The interrupter opens the primary circuit of the ignition coil at a specific moment, thereby causing induction of a high-voltage current in the secondary winding. The high-voltage current is fed through the distributor, which consists of a current-carrying rotor and a cover with electrical contacts, to the spark plugs of the appropriate cylinders. Regulating devices on the distributor automatically vary the timing of the spark advance according to the mode of operation of the engine. (See alsoIGNITION.)

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

distributor

[də′strib·yəd·ər]
(electricity)
Any device which allocates a telegraph line to each of a number of channels, or to each row of holes on a punched tape, in succession.
A rotary switch that directs the high-voltage ignition current in the proper firing sequence to the various cylinders of an internal combustion engine.
(electronics)
The electronic circuitry which acts as an intermediate link between the accumulator and drum storage.
(engineering)
A device for delivering an exact amount of fuel at the exact time at which it is required.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.