Rozhdestvenskii Monastery

Rozhdestvenskii Monastery

 

(Monastery of the Nativity), a monastery in Vladimir, founded on the Kliaz’ma River in the 12th century by Prince Andrei Bogoliubskii. Alexander Nevsky was buried in the monastery in 1263; his remains were removed to the Alexander Nevsky Monastery in St. Petersburg in 1724. Rozhdestvenskii Monastery was considered the most important Russian monastery until 1561. In 1667 it came under the direct jurisdiction of the highest church authority. In 1744 the monastery was converted into a bishops’ house, which was closed down after 1917. Architectural monuments include a belfry built in 1654 and a monastery wall dating from the early 18th century.

REFERENCE

Voronin, N. N. Vladimir, Bogoliubovo, Suzdal’, Iur’ev-Pol’skoi, 3rd ed. [Moscow, 1967.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Malygin points out, the monastery commanded 24 peasant homesteads in 1625, ranking second behind the Torzhok Rozhdestvenskii Monastery with 35 homesteads.
The Torzhok Rozhdestvenskii Monastery, which was later ascribed to the Borisoglebskii Monastery, increased its peasant households from 29 in 1653-61 to 51 in 1678.
Nearly a decade after the ascription, on 2 December 1674, a priest and former hegumen of the Torzhok Rozhdestvenskii Monastery named Iona voiced his own concern about the upkeep of this church in a petition to Kornilii, metropolitan of Novgorod (1674-95).
Tarasii's territorial ambitions also revealed themselves in his clever handling of the permanent acquisition of the lands of the Torzhok Rozhdestvenskii Monastery. In the early 17th century, this monastery had experienced difficulties in attracting followers.
In the late 1670s, the Rozhdestvenskii Monastery controlled over 50 peasant households and thus threatened to rival the Borisoglebskii Monastery with its 88 peasant households.
At the same time, the takeover of the Rozhdestvenskii Monastery also represented an opportunity for ready cash.
Archimandrite Iona Dumin of the Rozhdestvenskii Monastery in Vladimir (and future archbishop of Vologda) prepared the next edition of the SKin 1589, probably in conjunction with the elevation of Russia to a patriarchate.