Rugosa

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Related to Rugose coral: Coral animal

Rugosa

[‚rü′gō·sə]
(paleontology)
An order of extinct corals having either simple or compound skeletons with internal skeletal structures consisting mainly of three elements, the septa, tabulae, and dissepiments.

Rugosa

 

(also Tetracorallia), a subclass of extinct coelenterates of the class Actinozoa that existed from the Middle Ordovician to the end of the Permian. The coelenterates were solitary or colonial polyps having a calcareous external skeleton. Solitary forms were hornlike, cylindrical, or prismatic. Some had an operculum that covered the osculum when there was danger. The polyps inhabited shallow zones of seas, attaching themselves to underwater objects or lying freely on the bottom. In contrast to extant hexactinal polyps, Rugosa did not form reefs. The coelenterates are valuable in understanding the stratigraphy of the Paleozoic and the total evolution of coral polyps.

REFERENCE

Drushin, V. V. Paleontologiia bespozvonochnykh. Moscow, 1974.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coronado and Rodriguez (2009) recognized syringoporoid corals in the algal-mounds of Cosgaya Formation in Cantabria (Spain) where they occur associated with calcareous algae, chaetetids and rugose corals.
Lower Permian colonial rugose corals, western and northwestern Pangaea; taxonomy and distribution.
Crenulites is a cerioid colonial rugose coral genus, and Protrochiscolithus and Calapoecia are tabulate corals.
Most of the other macrofossils (gastropods, trilobites, rugose corals, cephalopods, sponges, algae) collected were taxonomically not identified.
The exposed part of the mound is approximately 25 m wide and up to 1.6 m thick and is composed of rugose corals in skeletal debris.
In late Ordovician Rawtheyan times, the rugose coral fauna in Baltoscandia was dominated by species of non-fossulate streptelasmatid genera, e.g., Streptelasma Hall, Bodophyllum Neuman, Borelasma Neuman, and Helicelasma Neuman.
Rugose corals. The pre-crisis rugose coral assemblage shows a gradual taxonomic and quantitative decrease in genera and species of the widespread family Durhaminidae.
On the taxonomy of the genus Streptelasma Hall and a description of some new rugose corals. ENSV Teaduste Akadeemia Geoloogia Instituudi Uurimised, 2, 19-26 [in Russian].
Rubble horizons containing broken rugose corals that are not in growth position are interpreted as wash over facies that were deposited behind the mound crest during storms.
What is more, altered community structure is also visible in the composition of the skeletal reef builders in the studied buildup, characterized by the lack of rugose corals and the abundance of heliolitid corals.