Runcorn

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Runcorn,

city (1991 pop. 63,995), Halton, W England, on the Mersey River. It is located on the Manchester Ship Canal and is the terminus of the Bridgewater Canal, which is connected to the Mersey by a series of locks. The main industry is the production of chemicals. Shipbuilding and ironworks are also important. The city is connected by bridge (2017) to WidnesWidnes
, city (1991 pop. 55,973), Halton, NW England, on the Mersey River. It is an important alkali-processing center. Other products are paints, soap, pharmaceuticals, and steel goods. It connected by bridge (2017) to Runcorn.
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. Runcorn owes its development chiefly to the construction of the Bridgewater Canal in the 18th cent. It was the site of a castle of Æthelflæd in the 10th cent. Runcorn was one of the new townsnew towns,
planned urban communities in Great Britain, developed by long-term loans from the central government and first authorized by the New Towns Act of 1946. The chief purpose of the act was to reduce congestion in the great cities (or at least prevent its increase) through
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 designated in the 1960s to accommodate overpopulation in the Liverpool and N Merseyside areas.
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Runcorn

a town in NW England, in Halton unitary authority, N Cheshire, on the Manchester Ship Canal: port and industrial centre; designated a new town in 1964. Pop.: 60 072 (2001)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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plant in Waukesha, Wi, and its European plant in Runcorn, England. Major investments totaling more than $15 million will be made in these facilities for sophisticated machining and custom designed equipment to provide manufacturing process capabilities that will be among the finest in the world.
Derek Birchall of Imperial Chemical Industries in Runcorn, England, says he has found a candidate role that might even have implications for Alzheimer's disease.
The work "brings practical applications for high-temperature superconductors closer to realization," notes Neil Alford of ICI Advanced Materials in Runcorn, England, in an accompanying commentary.