Runnymede

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Related to Runnymead: King John, Magna Carta, Runny nose

Runnymede

Runnymede or Runnimede (rŭnˈĭmēd), meadow, in Egham, Surrey, S England, on the south bank of the Thames River, W of London. Either on this meadow or on nearby Charter Island, King John accepted the Magna Carta (1215), which is commemorated by a memorial. There is also a memorial to John F. Kennedy on Runnymede.
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Runnymede

site of Magna Charta signing (1215). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 49–52, 213]
See: Freedom
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Runnymede

a meadow on the S bank of the Thames near Windsor, where King John met his rebellious barons in 1215 and acceded to Magna Carta
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Superbreak is offering a special bed-andbreakfast rate of pounds 49.50 at the four-star Runnymead Hotel and Spa on banks of the Thames a few miles from Windsor on April weekends from April 4, saving pounds 33.50 per person per night.
And sweetly on the mead below The fragrant gales of summer blow: While flowers shall spring, while Thames shall flow, That mead shall live in memory, Where valour on the tented field Triumphant raised his patriot shield, The voice of truth to kings revealed, And broke the chains of tyranny!" (53) This alluding to Runnymead and Cowper's Hill; and he may well talk of England's freedom and the chains of tyranny!
Outdoor shots were easy to do, as the Nettlefold Studios where the series was shot at Walton-on- Thames were close to Runnymead Meadow where King John signed the Magna Carta in 1215.
And such lands were bathed in water twice a day and they were called tidal flats or submerged lands or the shoreline.(1) And Nature in its wisdom proclaimed that such lands and the waters that covered them were held by all for the common beneficial uses of fishing and navigation, to feed and to survive and to escape to distant shores.(2) And natural law limited the sovereign's power over the flats to a trust for the weal of all subjects that they may always fish and navigate and engage in commerce over the flats.(3) And the Doctrine of Public Trust came into existence.(4) And it descended to us through the Roman period of Justinian, the sealing of Magna Carta at Runnymead, and the creation of Colonial America.(5)