Rushdie


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Rushdie

(Ahmed) Salman . born 1947, British writer, born in India, whose novels include Midnight's Children (1981), which won the Booker prize, Shame (1983), and The Ground Beneath Her Feet (1998). His novel The Satanic Verses (1988) was regarded as blasphemous by many Muslims and he was forced into hiding (1989) when the Ayatollah Khomeini called for his death
References in periodicals archive ?
It was not only the desire to move in a new direction that led Rushdie to a realistic approach to the novel, it was the material itself--the story of the violent, tragic demise of the Golden family, headed by the mysterious, aging patriarch Nero Golden.
It mentioned the recent announcement that several Iranian media outlets have raised the bounty for killing Rushdie by $600,000.
And yet Rushdie doesn't end his novel on this utopian note.
An EU-based source told FNA Saturday evening that Rushdie has "canceled his presence at the book fair and called off his visit to Frankfurt".
But while Rushdie creates an almost flawless superstructure, he fails to provide the novel a soul which it so desperately needed to have an eternal shelf- life.
Rushdie's memoir abounds in names--real names of the near and the dear, politicians, writers, editors, agents, translators, critics, artists, movie makers, stars from show business, journalists, estranged wives and adversaries, pet names, code names, pseudonyms and acronyms, not to mention the names he was called by his adversaries alongside the names of fictional characters--prompting an article in The Guardian suggesting that Rushdie should include a proper name index for this "finely produced work of non-fiction" (Sutherland 2012).
When Rushdie writes about actually existing Islam, he appears to be writing about Islam as something other than a personal belief, about Islam as a project, an idea out of which to mold a society.
Instead, it was heeded to and the security system was unleashed to make a no-show Rushdie.
The simple fact is that the Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee ordered the police to block my arrival," Rushdie tweeted before leaving India.
Some Islamic scholars have made an open invitation to controversial author Salman Rushdie for a debate.
Furthermore Rushdie allows the natural tension existing between parent and child in the narrative to develop and provide both real and imagined resistance to a set of cultural norms.
From that day to this, Rushdie says in the opening to his forceful third-person memoir, Joseph Anton--the pseudonym he adopted for 11 years while hiding, based on the first names of Conrad and Chekhov--the word fatwa "hung around his neck like a millstone.