Ruskin


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Ruskin

John. 1819--1900, English art critic and social reformer. He was a champion of the Gothic Revival and the Pre-Raphaelites and saw a close connection between art and morality. From about 1860 he argued vigorously for social and economic planning. His works include Modern Painters (1843--60), The Stones of Venice (1851--53), Unto this Last (1862), Time and Tide (1867), and Fors Clavigera (1871--84)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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A large number of bicentenary exhibitions are endeavouring this year to present one part of Ruskin's achievement or another.
Staff at Wednesbury Museum and Art Gallery held the special event to mark the Ruskin Pottery Gallery being re-displayed.
Ruskin's philanthropy was mixed up with the imperialist ferment of Oxford in the 1870s; and his attraction to childhood innocence places him in the company of Lewis Carroll and those 'men in Wonderland' whose 'girlhood'--to quote Catherine Robson--is hard and uncomfortable to categorise.
The open date and status above indicate when John Ruskin Primary School and Language Classes opened or when it changed to its most recent incarnation, with a number of schools converting to academies in recent years.
On the collaboration, Ruskin Bond said: "Whenever I run out of people to write about, I cook up a few ghosts.
I'd failed my 11+ but Ruskin allowed me to go on to Hull University to do an economics degree while still working.
The various aspects of Ruskin's thought that comprise his realism have been ably and extensively treated in the existing scholarship; in particular, his turn from Romanticism in the explication of pathetic fallacy is well established.
Students registered on Anglia Ruskin University's FdSc complete the pre-qualification period as part of their award and are required to meet all of the requirements for dispensing opticians as specified by the GOC.
A contrast is noticed in the nineteenth century history of the conservation movement through consideration of the views of the environmental purist in America, John Muir, and those of Ruskin, who viewed the natural landscape as the necessary setting for human action and not as something to be selectively set apart in some context of strict non-intervention.
Having traveled extensively around Great Britain and the Continent from a young age, John Ruskin developed strong emotional, aesthetic, and intellectual connections with many of the places he visited.
John Ruskin's (1819-1900) The Stones of Venice was tremendously influential at the end of the nineteenth century.