Ruskin

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Ruskin

John. 1819--1900, English art critic and social reformer. He was a champion of the Gothic Revival and the Pre-Raphaelites and saw a close connection between art and morality. From about 1860 he argued vigorously for social and economic planning. His works include Modern Painters (1843--60), The Stones of Venice (1851--53), Unto this Last (1862), Time and Tide (1867), and Fors Clavigera (1871--84)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
And returning to Jones's comments concerning the material effects of scalar discourses, it is in this sense that if Collins's account of Cornwall's Gothic difference can be read as a Ruskinian critique of industrial capitalist modernity, then so too it can be read with relation to what Philip Payton describes as the socio-economic 'paralysis or "fossilisation" of the region' in the years that followed its publication.
As Collins says at the beginning of No Name, "Let the house reveal its own secrets" (3); narration becomes an act of seeing in the Ruskinian sense, where imagination reaches "by intuition and intensity of gaze (not by reasoning, but by its authoritative opening and revealing power), a more essential truth than is seen at the surface of things" (Ruskin IV:284).
The narrative connects with its chosen Anglo-Indian audience by confirming the value of their irrational responses: they are Ruskinian seers standing before the mystery of native India.
They perceived his defense of artistic innovation, praise of French poets, formalism, and advocacy of free verse as an affront to their "Ruskinian socialism" (92-93).
The uncertain opening; the famous statement that "[w]e are not concerned with the very poor"; the development of mystical symbols, like the pig's teeth, in ways that seem to undermine their credibility; the ambiguous perorations on the sense of place or love of England; the satire of Ruskinian language: all these are ways of subverting the very authority the novel stages, exposing the beliefs it promulgates as constructed and contingent, revealing its very language as, like every language, necessarily partial (120).
But it has also led me to explore different modes of expression.' Meier proceeds to explain his role as an artist-architect, in the Ruskinian sense, who is also a sculptor and a painter, not just a builder.
Spear describes as "the Ruskinian historical analysis adopted by Morris," where the Medieval period is idealized as a model of unified English society: "Gothic architecture and the arts subsidiary to it were the organic expression of the convictions, values and talents of a whole people.
But the crucial revelation of this exhibition is a final group of late, elegiac landscapes: No longer Ruskinian essays in fanatical empiricism, they are melancholy symbolist explorations of the wild emptiness of the Scottish highlands.
I couldn't resist buying Andy Foster's pocket-friendly book Birmingham (Pevsner Architectural Guides / Yale University Press, pounds 9.99), in which the citybased architectural historian reveals that the Gallery "was built in 1877 in Ruskinian Gothic, with the east wing added in 1898".
The Century Guild is a grouping more readily associated with the Arts and Crafts movement and the Ruskinian tradition, a precursor to the Kelmscott project, than with canons of l'art pour l'art, or the idea of fin de siecle decadence.
In an article in Le Figaro (June 15, 1907), Proust described Giverny as a painting and called it "not so much a garden of flowers as of colors and tones, less of an old-fashioned flower garden than a color garden." Proust's second essay, "Monet" gave him the opportunity (often seized on in Remembrance) to indulge in a highly wrought, exquisitely chromatic Ruskinian description, which conveys the impression of languidly drifting through those flowery waters and watery flowers.
In other words, the Ruskinian ideal and Eliot's objective correlative theory reached its perfection in Hemingway's work (Baker 1952: 58-62).