Rutebeuf


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Rutebeuf

(rütəböf`), fl. between 1254 and 1285, French poet. He was the author of an early miracle play, Le Miracle de Théophile, and of fabliaux, allegories, saints' lives, and satires. Skillfully using legend, he eloquently attacked social abuses and mocked the flaws of all classes.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rutebeuf

 

(also Rustebeuf). Born circa 1230 in Champagne; died 1285 in Paris. French poet and playwright.

Rutebeuf wrote satirical verses that reflected medieval urban life, songs about the Crusades, fabliaux, and religious dramas. He also wrote about the lives of saints. He denounced the vices of the nobility, the greed of the urban elite, and the hypocrisy of the clergy. Rutebeuf wrote The Miracle of Theophilus (c. 1261; Russian translation by A. A. Blok, 1907), which deals with a man who sells his soul to the devil.

WORKS

Oeuvres complètes, vols. 1–2. Paris, 1959–60.
In Russian translation:
In Khrestomatiia po zarubezhnoi literature: Literatura srednikh vekov. Moscow, 1953.

REFERENCES

Istoriia frantsuzskoi literatury, vol. 1. Moscow-Leningrad, 1946. Pages 161–63.
Lafeuille, G. Rutebeuf Paris [1966].
Serper, A. Rutebeuf poète satirique. Paris, 1969.
Regalado, N. F. Poetic Patterns in Rutebeuf. New Haven-London, 1970.

A. D. MIKHAILOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dufournet vinculou, com razao, os testamentos de Villon a este genero representado desde o seculo XIII pelos jongleurs, que enunciavam em primeira pessoa o discurso de uma personagem ficcional, como, por exemplo, o Dit de l'herberie, de Rutebeuf, que representa um vendedor charlatao de remedios.
Medieval troubadours (Francois Villon, Rutebeuf) and Renaissance poets (Pierre de Ronsard) reveal a lively dynamics of both external and internal dialogisation.
And here's the even greater truth: to bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon, and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, 'a moment in the life' of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
And here's the even greater truth: To bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, "a moment in the life" of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
Yet, Waters's careful exposition of the fabliau about the peasant who argued his way into heaven reveals how one Paris university student at least, Rutebeuf, engaged humour to teach how all Christians could earn their place in heaven.
The inaugural column featured a poem by French medieval poet Rutebeuf who broke with the courtly tradition of the troubadours.
Pensemos na queixa de Rutebeuf (5): "Em que se transformaram meus amigos?
"Chaucer's Pardoner, Rutebeuf's 'Dit de l'Herberie,' the 'Dit du Mercier' and Cultural History." Viator 38.1 (2007): 289-319.
Were Rutebeuf, Villon, Jeffers, Baudelaire, Bukowski, and Whitman members?