Rydberg atom


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Rydberg atom

An atom which possesses one valence electron orbiting about an atomic nucleus within an electron shell well outside all the other electrons in the atom. Such an atom approximates the hydrogen atom in that a single electron is interacting with a positively charged core. Early observations of atomic electrons in such Rydberg quantum states involved studies of the Rydberg series in optical spectra. Electrons jumping between Rydberg states with adjacent principal quantum numbers, n and n - 1, with n near 80 produce microwave radiation. Microwave spectral lines due to such electronic transitions in Rydberg atoms have been observed both in laboratory experiments and in the emissions originating from certain low-density partially ionized portions of the universe called HII regions. See Electron configuration

The advent of the laser has made possible the production of sizable numbers of Rydberg atoms within a bulb containing gas at low pressures, 10-2 torr (1.3 pascals) or less. The rapid energy-resonance absorption of several laser light photons by an atom in its normal or ground state results in a Rydberg atom in a state with a selected principal quantum number. Aggregates of Rydberg atoms have been used as sensitive detectors of infrared radiation, including thermal radiation. They have also been observed to collectively participate in spontaneous photon emission, called superradiance. Such aggregates form the active medium for infrared lasers that operate through the usual laser mechanism of collective stimulated photon emission. All these developments are based upon the great sensitivity of Rydberg atoms to external electromagnetic radiation fields. Atoms with n near 40 can absorb almost instantaneously over a hundred microwave photons and become ionized at easily achievable microwave power levels. Isotope separation techniques have been developed that combine the selectivity of laser excitation of Rydberg states with the ready ionizability of Rydberg atoms. Such applications have been pursued for atoms ranging from deuterium through uranium. See Infrared radiation, Laser

Rydberg atom

[′rid‚bərg ‚ad·əm]
(atomic physics)
An atom whose outer electron has been excited to very high energy states, far from the nucleus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For their experiment, the researchers used a programmable quantum simulator based on Rydberg atom arrays.
The Rydberg molecules in question were formed from two atoms of rubidium - one a Rydberg atom, and one a normal atom.
In such atoms, the electron is so far away from the nucleus that the latter's size is negligible, and the electron would accelerate less in its high-flung orbit, reducing the effects of "virtual photons" it emits and allowing theoretical uncertainties to be as small as tens of parts in a (a) In a Rydberg atom, an electron (black dot) is far away from the atomic nucleus (red and grey core).
Using a laser, energy was transferred to one of these atoms, turning it into a Rydberg atom with a huge atomic radius.
When this cloud is illuminated with a highly-precise beam of laser light, one of the rubidium atoms is converted into what's known as a Rydberg atom.
In the new experiments, Rice graduate students Brendan Wyker and Shuzhen Ye began by using an ultraviolet laser to create a Rydberg atom.
A Rydberg atom is an atom having one highly excited electron orbiting far beyond the usual electron paths.
Rydberg atom, having a high principle quantum number, engages in strong interactions because of its large dipole matrix element.
1) Rydberg atom dynamics: The study of complex open-system dynamics in gases of laser-driven Rydberg atoms, including the study of the effects and control of dissipation and decoherence from spontaneous emission in strongly interacting gases.
We have calculated that a group of "highly excited" atoms ((http://www.phys.uconn.edu/%7Ercote/Projects/Rydberg/Rydberg.html) called Rydberg atoms 6 in which the electrons have been pushed out far away from the (https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-are-fundamental-particles-38339) atom's nucleus , making it huge 6 will emit a bright pulse of light when hit by a gravitational wave.
Researchers cooled cesium atoms to nearly absolute zero, hitting them with lasers to form Rydberg atoms that bound together in pairs.