Ryswick Peace of 1697

Ryswick Peace of 1697

 

a treaty that ended the war of 1688–97 between France and the League of Augsburg. It consisted of a series of agreements concluded in Ryswick (Rijswijk, near The Hague) between France and Great Britain (September 20), France and Holland (September 20), France and Spain (September 20), and France and the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, as well as with individual German princes (October 30).

In accordance with the treaty France renounced most of the territories that it had captured after the Nijmegen peace talks of 1678–79. It returned to Spain almost all the territory captured in Catalonia and in the Spanish Netherlands. It also ceded territories to the empire, including Freiburg im Breisgau and Philipps-burg. Strasbourg and other Alsatian lands remained in France’s possession. The treaty was abrogated in 1701 by the War of the Spanish Succession.

References in periodicals archive ?
Lowerre is interested in the effect that wider political events and social mores had on the theatre, tracking the theatrical responses to the Ryswick Peace of 1697, the Lord Chamberlain's renewed interest in censorship after Jeremy Collier's A Short View of the Immorality and Prophaness of the English Stage appeared in 1698, and the proliferation of "Scotch" songs as the proposed union between England and Scotland increasingly preoccupied public discourse.