s-process

(redirected from S process)

s-process

A slow process of nucleosynthesis by which heavy stable nuclei are synthesized from the iron-peak elements (mass number 56) by successive captures of neutrons. The process occurs when there is a low density of neutrons in a star, the neutrons being by-products of nuclear-fusion reactions. If the nucleus produced by a neutron capture is stable it will eventually capture another neutron; if the nucleus is radioactive it will have sufficient time to emit a beta particle (i.e. an electron) to stabilize itself before further neutron capture. Thus the stable isotopes of an element are synthesized until a radioisotope is produced, at which point a new element forms by beta decay. Many years or decades may elapse between successive neutron captures. The most abundant nuclei produced by the s-process will be those with a low ability to capture neutrons. The s-process cannot synthesize nuclei beyond bismuth–209 because neutron capture by this nuclei results in rapid alpha decay. Compare r-process.

s-process

[′es ‚prä·səs]
(nuclear physics)
The synthesis of elements, predominantly in the iron group, over long periods of time through the capture of slow neutrons which are produced mainly by the reactions of α-particles with carbon-13 and neon-21.