elevation

(redirected from S-T segment elevation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

elevation

elevation, vertical distance from a datum plane, usually mean sea level to a point above the earth. Often used synonymously with altitude, elevation is the height on the earth's surface and altitude, the height in space above the surface. The elevation of a feature is calculated through such surveying techniques as trigonometric triangulation and aerial photogrammetry. Elevation is represented by using contours of equal elevation lines, three-dimensional computer graphics representation, or molded three-dimensional plastic models.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

Elevation

A drawing showing the vertical elements of a building, either interior or exterior, as a direct projection to a vertical plane.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Elevation

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Elevation is the angular distance of a celestial body above the horizon. An elevated planet in a natal chart, especially if it is near the midheaven and in the tenth house, is said to exert a particularly strong influence on the entire chart. In traditional astrology, elevated malefic planets, especially when elevated above the Sun and Moon, were said to exert an unfavorable influence over the entire chart. Modern astrologers have largely rejected this interpretation. For instance, a well-aspected Saturn (traditionally considered the Greater Malefic) placed in the tenth house is in the house of its accidental dignity, and although this placement may indicate delay, it also indicates ultimate success (should other factors support this interpretation) in one’s profession.

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Elevation

 

a part of the earth’s surface characterized by its elevation in relation to surrounding areas (for example, the Valdai Hills, the Central Russian Uplands). Convention-ally, an elevation is defined as an area with an absolute height of over 200 m and is contrasted to lowlands.


Elevation

 

a term used in classical dance. Elevation, as defined by A. Ia. Vaganova, consists of two concepts: elevation proper (the height of a jump) and ballon (the ability to maintain a pose as if suspended in the air).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

elevation

[‚el·ə′vā·shən]
(engineering)
Vertical distance to a point or object from sea level or some other datum.
(graphic arts)
A graphic projection of a machine or structure on a vertical plane without perspective.
(ordnance)
In antiaircraft artillery, a term sometimes applied to the angular height.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

elevation

1. A drawing showing the vertical elements of a building, either exterior or interior, as a direct projection to a vertical plane.
2. The vertical distance above or below some established reference level.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

elevation

elevation
i. The vertical distance of a point or a level on the surface of the earth, measured from the mean sea level. For airfields, it is above mean sea level (ICAO).
ii. The angle in the vertical plane between an object and the natural horizon. See angle of elevation.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

elevation

1. a drawing to scale of the external face of a building or structure
2. the external face of a building or structure
3. a ballet dancer's ability to leap high
4. RC Church the lifting up of the Host at Mass for adoration
5. Astronomy another name for altitude
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005