SD formats


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SD formats

Following is a summary of earlier standard-definition analog and digital video formats, which provided up to 480 lines of resolution in the North American market (576 lines in other countries). These formats were captured on camcorders and transferred to the computer via cassette or uploading. They reached the user via the Internet, broadcast TV, satellite TV, cable TV or DVD. In addition to editing the content, there were often one or more format conversions between the video capture and the final viewing format. See DTV and codec examples.

More Encoding Variables in Digital Video
Unlike analog formats, which were tied to specific NTSC and PAL resolutions and frame rates, there are many more encoding variables in digital formats, especially in HD formats (for more details, see video format). For high-definition video formats, see HD formats.

Analog SD Formats



Betacam/Betacam SP
Professional 1/2" videotape version of Sony's Betamax consumer format. Betacam SP improved resolution. See Betacam.

Betamax
First consumer 1/2" videotape format from Sony. See Betamax.

Hi8
High-resolution 8mm videotape from Sony. See Hi8.

VHS
Most popular consumer 1/2" videotape format, developed by JVC. See VHS.

Video8
First 8mm videotape format to compete with VHS and Betamax in the late 1980s.


Digital SD Formats



For digital HD video formats, see HD formats.

D-1
Highest-quality uncompressed 3/4" videotape for mastering. See D-1.

D-3 and D-5
High-quality uncompressed 1/2" videotape formats for mastering. See D-3 and D-5.

D-9 (Digital-S)
High-quality 1/2" videotape that uses DV encoding. See D-9.

Digital8
Digital version of Sony's Hi8 8mm videotape. See Digital8.

Digital Betacam
Digital version of Sony's Betacam 1/2" videotape. See Digital Betacam.

DV and MiniDV
Widely used videotape format from consumers to professionals. It was later followed by tapeless DV camcorders. See DV.

DVCAM
Sony's variant of DV videotape technology. See DVCAM.

DVCPRO
Panasonic's variant of DV videotape technology. See DVCPRO.

DVD
The standard SD optical disc. See DVD.

XDCAM
Sony's tapeless camcorder format. See XDCAM.
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