surface-conduction electron-emitter display

(redirected from SED TV)

surface-conduction electron-emitter display

A thin CRT technology developed by Canon that was based on field emission technology (FED). Announced in 2002, Canon created a joint venture with Toshiba to develop surface-conduction electron-emitter (SED) TVs, and prototypes at the 2006 CES show in Las Vegas demonstrated remarkable clarity. However, a lawsuit over sharing licensed technology relating to carbon nanotube emitters caused Canon to buy out Toshiba's stake in 2007. Due to improvements in LCD TV technology, Canon later turned its attention to OLED displays and liquidated its SED Inc. subsidiary in 2010.

Similar to Plasma Displays
Using millions of low voltage emitters (one for each pixel) on the cathode plate and regular CRT-like phosphors on the glass anode plate, the SED display used a third of the power of plasma displays. See FED and plasma display.
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Seemingly naive for a company as experienced in the IP courtroom as Canon, the failure to negotiate a cross-licensing agreement with Nanotech for all three parties has cost them dearly: failure to launch the SED TV early this year may well see rivals step in much earlier with competing technologies, such as laser TV.
Canon drew selling after saying Wednesday that it and Toshiba will delay the release of a jointly developed surface-conduction electron-emitter display television, or SED TV, until the October-December period of 2007 from the originally planned release date this spring.
While this remains in the planning process, Samsung expects to release the SED TV by the first quarter of 2006 in limited qualities.
Canon initially launched SED TV production jointly with Toshiba Corp.
The two companies plan to start selling SED TVs under their own names later this year, with combined monthly sales targeted at 1,000 units.
Toshiba would like to prevent SED TV prices from falling and defend Toshiba's brand prestige with SED TVs, even if a day may come when LCD TV prices fall to levels close to those of cathode ray tube TVs, he said.
On the outlook for the surface-conduction electron emitter display TVs which Toshiba is developing with Canon Inc., Nishida said his company has high hopes for SED TVs' potential in view of the ultra-high image quality the SED technology enables.
The two firms had earlier planned to start limited SED TV production at a Canon facility in Hiratsuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, for sales beginning in the spring of this year.
But Toshiba, a partner at the trilateral venture, will refrain from joining the greater investment plan this time, partly because it will put priority on developing the next-generation flat-screen SED TV in conjunction with Canon Corp., industry officials said.
said Wednesday their alliance will delay the release of a next-generation high quality-image TV, known as a surface-conduction electron-emitter display television, or SED TV, until the October-December period of 2007 from the originally planned release date this spring.
SED TV models incorporating Toshiba technology for equipment such as tuners will be marketed by both companies, the daily said.
In May, Toshiba and Canon had to postpone the launch of SED TVs for an indefinite period due to a patent lawsuit in the United States.