SIR


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Sir

1. a title of honour placed before the name of a knight or baronet
2. Archaic a title placed before the name of a figure from ancient history

SIR

(language)
An early system on the IBM 650.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].

SIR

(standard)
Serial Infrared. An infrared standard from IrDA, part of IrDA Data. SIR supports asynchronous communications at 9600 bps - 115.2 Kbps, at a distance of up to 1 metre.

SIR

(Serial InfraRed) The physical protocol of the IrDA wireless transmission standard. See IrDA.
References in classic literature ?
Then was Arthur wroth and said to himself, 'I will ride to the churchyard, and take the sword with me that sticketh in the stone, for my brother Sir Kay shall not be without a sword this day.' So when he came to the churchyard Sir Arthur alit and tied his horse to the stile, and so he went to the tent and found no knights there, for they were at the jousting, and so he handled the sword by the handles, and lightly and fiercely pulled it out of the stone, and took his horse and rode his way until he came to his brother Sir Kay, and delivered him the sword.
"After what I have already told you, Sir Patrick, of Miss Silvester's conduct, may I ask whether you consider that proceeding at all extraordinary?"
HOW SIR LAUNCELOT SLEW TWO GIANTS, AND MADE A CASTLE FREE
"I am glad to hear it." Sir Leicester very lofty indeed.
"Very little, if any, sir. It was said, and said truly, I am afraid, that her means of living came privately from Sir Percival Glyde."
"I am Sir Richard of the Lea; then I will go seek him forthwith," said the Knight.
'To have me in his service, Sir?' cried Kit, who had stopped short in his work and faced about on the ladder like some dexterous tumbler.
But confusion and disorder still reigned among the Spaniards for Sir William Felton and his men had swept through half their camp, leaving a long litter of the dead and the dying to mark their course.
'So very kind of you to invite me, you mean, Sir Mulberry,' replied Mrs Nickleby, tossing her head, and looking prodigiously sly.
'Would you permit me to shut the door, sir, and will you further, sir, give me your honour bright, that what passes between us is in the strictest confidence?'
'is there no way of accommodating this matter--step this way, sir, for a moment--into this window, Sir, where we can be alone --there, sir, there, pray sit down, sir.
"This man has just arrived from Paris, sir," he continued, "and is the bearer of a letter which he is instructed to deliver into your hands only."