Kepler's star

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Kepler's star

A supernova that was observed in Oct. 1604 in the constellation Ophiuchus and could be seen with the naked eye for over a year. It was studied by astronomers in Europe, China, and Korea and its position was so accurately determined by Kepler and Fabricius that a small patch of nebulosity above the galactic plane could be identified as the remnant of the original 1604 supernova (Walter Baade, 1943). The light curve plotted from the original observations shows that the magnitude increased to a maximum of over –2.5, dropping to +4 in about 300 days, and that it was a type Ia supernova.
References in periodicals archive ?
SN 1604 brought about a great discussion among seventeenth-century astronomers and the contents of that debate render its appearance a pregnant event of the Scientific Revolution.
William Shea's contribution manages to illustrate the main points of Galilei's investigation about SN 1604.
His De Stella Nova in Pede Serpentarii (The New Star on the Foot of the Serpent Bearer) is the most important work on SN 1604 and it reflects the mathematical arrangement and rational reasoning of his astronomical research.
As a Copernican, Kepler upheld the vast distance between Saturn and the fixed stars in order to establish that SN 1604 could not have been born as an effect of that planetary meeting.
The Korean records are very useful to establish the light curve of SN 1604.