spat

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spat

1. a larval oyster or similar bivalve mollusc, esp when it settles to the sea bottom and starts to develop a shell
2. such oysters or other molluscs collectively
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

spat

A protective covering (usually stainless steel) at the bottom of a doorframe to prevent or minimize damage in this area.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, the average density of oyster spats varied from 0.002 to 0.067 spats [cm.sup.-2] at location I (raft), and from 0.049 to 0.612 spats [cm.sup.-2] at location II (mangrove).
There is evidence that barnacles can also remove the oyster spats from the substrate (OSMAN et al., 1989).
With the decreased rains, there was a substantial increase of spats attached to collectors at point II and at the roots of the surrounding mangrove.
Her daughter, who has washed dishes at El Vaquero, bused tables at Red Agave and waited on customers at June, has embraced her role as front-of-house manager at Carmelita Spats.
She said: "I could barely look up, but when I did, I saw Spats crawling along the window ledge like he always did.
She said: "Spats loves to just lie and be stroked and it was therapeutic for my dad.
"Unfortunately, he passed away but I think it's important Spats did come back at the right time."
Food quality and quantity are important factors for successful development of bivalve larvae and spat (Laing 1995, Gagne et al.
Another factor that may influence larval and spat development is the nutritional status of the broodstock (Utting & Millican 1998, Farias-Molina 2001).
The current study aimed to determine the effect of (1) ambient light, (2) periodicity of tank cleaning, (3) different diets and feeding regimes, and (4) broodstock conditioning on growth and productivity of spat of Nodipecten nodosus under hatchery conditions.
Regression analysis was used to test the seasonal larvae abundance and spat settlement on short-term collectors ([R.sup.2]; df; P = 0.05).
A statistically significant relationship between the larval abundance in the water column (sample before 15 days) (Air; ind/[m.sup.3]) and settled spat abundance (Ac; ind/[m.sup.2]) in both species was found.