squid


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squid,

carnivorous marine cephalopodcephalopod
, member of the class Cephalopoda, the most highly organized group of mollusks (phylum Mollusca), and including the squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, and nautiluses. The class as a whole has become adapted for a free-swimming existence.
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 mollusk. The squid is one of the most highly developed invertebrates, well adapted to its active, predatory life. The characteristic molluscan shell is reduced to a horny plate shaped like a quill pen and buried under the mantle.

The mantle, the chief swimming organ of the animal, is modified into lengthwise fins along the posterior end of the body and projects forward like a collar around the head. As the mantle relaxes and contracts, the squid swims forward, upward, and downward. Water is expelled in jets from the muscular funnel located just below the head, propelling the squid backward in abrupt jetlike motions. Two of the ten sucker-bearing arms (used to steer in swimming) are tentacles that can seize prey, which is then cut into pieces by the animal's strong beaklike jaws.

The squid breathes through gills, and may emit a cloud of inky material from its ink sac when in danger. The circulatory and nervous systems are highly developed. The eye of the squid is remarkably similar to that of humans—an example of convergent evolution, as there is no common ancestor. Squids are also distinguished by internal cartilaginous supports. Some deep-sea forms have luminescent organs.

The common squid is found from Maine to the Carolinas, often moving in shoals. In the United States tons of squid are used for fish bait, particularly by the cod fisheries in New England. Squid is a favorite food in East Asia and in the Mediterranean area. Species range in size from about 2 in. (5 cm) to the proportions of Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni, the colossal squid, which is the largest of all invertebrates and may attain a mantle length of 13 ft (4 m) and total length of 33–46 ft (10–14 m), and the giant squid, Architeuthis dux, which has a mantle length of 7.4 ft (2.25 m) and is known to reach 43 ft (13 m) in total length.

Squids are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Cephalopoda, order Teuthoidea.

SQUID

An acronym for superconducting quantum interference device, which actually refers to two different types of device, the dc SQUID and the rf SQUID.

The dc SQUID consists of two Josephson tunnel junctions connected in parallel on a superconducting loop (see illustration). A small applied current flows through the junctions as a supercurrent, without developing a voltage, by means of Cooper pairs of electrons tunneling through the barriers. However, when the applied current exceeds a certain critical value, a voltage is generated. When a magnetic field is applied so that a magnetic flux threads the loop, the critical value oscillates as the magnetic flux is changed, with a period of one flux quantum, weber, where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge. The oscillations arise from the interference of the two waves describing the Cooper pairs at the two junctions, in a way that is closely analogous to the interference between two coherent electromagnetic waves. See Interference of waves, Josephson effect, Superconductivity

Direct-current (dc) SQUID with enclosed magnetic flux Φenlarge picture
Direct-current (dc) SQUID with enclosed magnetic flux Φ

The rf SQUID consists of a single junction interrupting a superconducting loop. In operation, it is coupled to the inductor of an LC-tank circuit excited at its resonant frequency by a radio-frequency (rf) current. The rf voltage across the tank circuit oscillates as a function of the magnetic flux in the loop, again with a period of one flux quantum. Although SQUIDs were for many years operated while immersed in liquid helium, ceramic superconductors with high transition temperatures make possible devices operating in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

SQUIDs have important device applications. Usually with the addition of a superconducting input circuit known as a flux transformer, both dc and rf SQUIDs are used as magnetometers to detect tiny changes in magnetic field. The output of the SQUID is amplified by electronic circuitry at room temperature and fed back to the SQUID so as to cancel any applied flux. This makes it possible to detect changes in flux as small as 10-6 of one flux quantum with SQUIDs based on low-transition-temperature superconductors, corresponding to magnetic field changes of the order of 1 femtotesla in a 1-hertz bandwidth. Suitable modifications to the input circuit enable the SQUID to measure other physical quantities, including voltages, displacement, or magnetic susceptibility. SQUIDs are also used for logic and switching elements in experimental digital circuits and high-speed analog-to-digital converters. See Superconducting devices

squid

[skwid]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of a number of marine cephalopod mollusks characterized by a reduced internal shell, ten tentacles, an ink sac, and chromatophores.

SQUID

[skwid]

SQUID

An acronym for superconducting quantum interference device, which actually refers to two different types of device, the dc SQUID and the rf SQUID.

The dc SQUID consists of two Josephson tunnel junctions connected in parallel on a superconducting loop (see illustration). A small applied current flows through the junctions as a supercurrent, without developing a voltage, by means of Cooper pairs of electrons tunneling through the barriers. However, when the applied current exceeds a certain critical value, a voltage is generated. When a magnetic field is applied so that a magnetic flux threads the loop, the critical value oscillates as the magnetic flux is changed, with a period of one flux quantum, weber, where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge. The oscillations arise from the interference of the two waves describing the Cooper pairs at the two junctions, in a way that is closely analogous to the interference between two coherent electromagnetic waves.

The rf SQUID consists of a single junction interrupting a superconducting loop. In operation, it is coupled to the inductor of an LC-tank circuit excited at its resonant frequency by a radio-frequency (rf) current. The rf voltage across the tank circuit oscillates as a function of the magnetic flux in the loop, again with a period of one flux quantum. Although SQUIDs were for many years operated while immersed in liquid helium, ceramic superconductors with high transition temperatures make possible devices operating in liquid nitrogen at 77 K.

SQUIDs have important device applications. Usually with the addition of a superconducting input circuit known as a flux transformer, both dc and rf SQUIDs are used as magnetometers to detect tiny changes in magnetic field. The output of the SQUID is amplified by electronic circuitry at room temperature and fed back to the SQUID so as to cancel any applied flux. This makes it possible to detect changes in flux as small as 10-6 of one flux quantum with SQUIDs based on low-transition-temperature superconductors, corresponding to magnetic field changes of the order of 1 femtotesla in a 1-hertz bandwidth. Suitable modifications to the input circuit enable the SQUID to measure other physical quantities, including voltages, displacement, or magnetic susceptibility. SQUIDs are also used for logic and switching elements in experimental digital circuits and high-speed analog-to-digital converters. See Analog-to-digital converter, Integrated circuits, Superconducting devices

squid

1
any of various fast-moving pelagic cephalopod molluscs of the genera Loligo, Ommastrephes, etc., of most seas, having a torpedo-shaped body ranging from about 10 centimetres to 16.5 metres long and a pair of triangular tail fins: order Decapoda (decapods)

squid

2
Brit slang a pound sterling

SQUID

(Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) An electronic detection system that uses Josephson junctions circuits. It is capable of detecting extremely weak signals.
References in periodicals archive ?
This confirms the high solubility of squid mantle protein, previously documented in other studies (Cortes-Ruiz et al., 2008; Dihort-Garcia et al., 2011).
If squid can pick which cable doodads to use and when, the animals could improve the match between their under-eye shine and conditions in the ocean.
Open the box and remove the squid. Repeat steps 4 to 6 with the hole-punched squid.
In Oman, squids are found along the coastal strip of the sultanate, especially in the Arabian Sea, which extends from the coast of Ras al Hadd to the coasts of the Governorate of Dhofar.
"The giant squid is large and certainly unusual from our human perspective," said Sonke Johnsen, Professor of Biology at Duke University, in ablog post.
According to the research team, squids live on the edge of their environmental oxygen limitations due to their energy-taxing swimming technique.
Last year, Vietnam mainly exported live, fresh and frozen squid and octopus products, accounting for 67 per cent of the export volume, while processed products accounted for 33 per cent.
Embryological studies on the common squid Ommastrephes sloani pacificus Steenstrup, in the southwestern waters of the Sea of Japan.
Similar behavior patterns were reported for the loliginid Doryteuthis pealeii in reaction to trawl nets in the NE Atlantic (Glass et al., 1999); i.e., patchy schools of squid swam up to "three min" tail-first in front of the trawl mouth (~3 knots) and, upon tiring, raised to the top panels and turned around, pointing the tail at the net mouth.
A representative from the New Zealand Department of Conservation told the Herald that the divers most likely found a giant squid (Architeuthis dux) and not a colossal squid (Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni).
BAKED STUFFED SQUID Remove insides of 900g squid, rinse in cold water several times.