SS Cygni

SS Cygni

(sig -nÿ, -nee) The brightest dwarf nova. Normally of 12th magnitude, it rises to maybe 8th magnitude every month or so: its period varies widely from the mean of 51 days; the maxima vary in shape, brightness, and duration. Like other dwarf novae it is a close binary system in which one component is a white dwarf; the other is a normal G5 star. The orbital period is 6.5 hours. SS Cygni is also an intense, soft X-ray source, i.e. an X-ray binary.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the best known dwarf novae is SS Cygni, which spends most of its time in quiescence at 12th magnitude, but every couple of months suddenly brightens to 8th magnitude for a few days before gradually fading again.
Dispute continues over SS Cygni. New radio observations by James Miller-Jones (Curtin University, Australia) and his colleagues feed the debate over the true distance to one of the most-watched variable stars.
The dwarf nova SS Cygni was reported rising in such an outburst at V magnitude 9.54 on 2013 Sept 22.1.
Kraft reported that at least four stars of this type were short-period spectroscopic binaries, in addition to SS Cygni, which was already known to be one.
(43) Even after his retirement, Brook remained active in the Section and produced many variable star charts (as well as continuing the series of reports on SS Cygni mentioned previously).
In 1911 Brook wrote: 'SS Cygni is a fascinating and mysterious star.
The prototype of the class of stars that bears its name, the cataclysmic variable SS Cygni has been observed essentially nonstop since its discovery in 1896.
The AAVSO's worldwide network of observers would monitor the behavior of these stars and report immediately when one of them, such as SS Cygni or U Geminorum, would go into outburst.
Of course, I started with well-known stars like R Coronae Borealis and SS Cygni."
Mauche presented EUVE data on SS Cygni, the brightest dwarf nova in the northern sky.
Thankfully, in addition to serving as the embodiment of detente, the astronauts captured two white-dwarf stars, the dwarf nova SS Cygni, a flare on Proxima Centauri, and high-energy emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) itself.
To this day Cragg gets annoyed when amateurs insist on using photometers without understanding whether they really need them: "It doesn't require an accuracy of a thousandth of a magnitude to tell whether SS Cygni is at maximum or at minimum," he says.