SSID broadcast


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SSID broadcast

The continuous transmission of packets from a Wi-Fi access point that announces its availability. Also called "beaconing," if the network is secured with a password, users will see the SSID, but not be able to access it (see WEP and WPA). The SSID is displayed in a mobile device's list of Wi-Fi networks, and it will attempt to connect if it has previously established the connection.

Stop the Broadcasting
The simplest security measure is to disable SSID broadcast in the access point or router and change the default SSID name to an obscure one. In that way, only users who know the name can log in. However, a hacker can still extract the SSID from packets being transmitted, but a password adds the essential security layer. In addition, for people concerned about Wi-Fi radiation, turning off the SSID beaconing eliminates the on-going signaling. See wireless isolation, SSID, Wi-Fi hotspot and cloaking.


Disable Broadcasting
In any wireless router or access point, one click stops the Wi-Fi from constantly advertising.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are a great deal of information sources that recommend users stop or to disable the SSID broadcast; we strongly recommend against this action.
* Wireless SSID Broadcast. This determines whether your access point will broadcast the SSID.
Advanced authentication and encryption security features include the new WPA, up to 152-bit WEP encryption, 802.1x authentication and dynamic key management, support for FUNK Odyssey and Microsoft RADIUS Server, MAC address authentication, disabled SSID broadcast, and VLANs support.
Similar to changing the SSID name, turning off the SSID broadcast does not make your access point secure, but does require the hacker to jump through a couple more hoops to sniff out your network.
Advanced authentication and encryption security features include the new WPA2, up to 152-bit WEP encryption, AES encryption, 802.1x authentication and dynamic key management, support for FUNK Odyssey and Microsoft RADIUS Server, MAC address authentication, disabled SSID broadcast, and VLANs support.--SMC Networks
The D-Link MWLAN access points will come equipped with a 10/100Mbps 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE) LAN port, two removable high gain antennas, transmit power adjustment capabilities, load balancing, support for up to 16 SSIDs, guest VLAN support, and the ability to disable SSID broadcasts.
Security best practices such as encrypting wireless traffic, turning off SSID broadcasts, and implementing channel separation help protect sensitive information.
In addition they include load balancing, guest VLAN support, support for up to 16 SSIDs and the ability to disable SSID broadcasts and will incorporate enhanced security and management features.