Inhibitor

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Related to SSRI: serotonin, SNRI

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some trials had as few as 8 participants, the duration of the trials was short (8 weeks mostly), the patient population consisted of a mixture of in- and outpatients, the exclusion criteria in many trials were too strict (excluding the more depressed patients, who would show the greatest response to SSRIs), trials varied in methodology, only if the trials were pooled was the increase in suicidal behaviour present, the trials were not designed to address whether SSRIs increase suicidality and there were varying trial methods used.
It is no accident that this shift in thinking about how to handle mild depression has occurred at the same time as the development of the SSRI drugs, along with extensive marketing campaigns by the companies that manufacture them.
Around the same time, a medical commission England tightened guidelines for using SSRIs and other antidepressants in adults, recommending the drugs only for the initial treatment of moderate-to-severe depression, preferably in combination with psychotherapy.
Fat and lean mass were measured separately in this study, and, "to our surprise, SSRI use was positively associated with both outcome variables in a similar manner," Dr.
This study didn't account for SSRI indication as a potential confounder, and the study's inclusion of inpatients, whose illnesses are typically more severe, may limit generalizability.
Editor's Note: One-third of patients treated for depression with SSRIs suffer a second depressive episode within one year, report the authors.
"Clinicians and patients need to balance the potential small increase in the risk of PPHN, along with oth er risks that have been attributed to SSRI use during pregnancy, with the benefits attributable to these drugs in improving maternal health and well-being," they wrote.
Moreover, the adjusted risk of cardiovascular mortality over the course of a median 5 years of follow-up in this observational study was 36% lower in SSRI-treated patients with PTSD and metabolic syndrome than in those not on an SSRI, and 64% lower in SSRI-treated patients with PTSD without metabolic syndrome.
However, in the final analysis that accounted for maternal characteristics including previous psychiatric hospitalizations, SSRI exposure was no longer associated with stillbirth or postneonatal death.
L-methvlfolate plus SSRI or SNRI from treatment initiation compared to SSRI or SNRI monotherapy in a major depressive episode.
SSRI Stories now contains 628 murder incidents, counting school shootings and workplace violence, and more than 200 murder-suicides.
A woman was considered exposed to an SSRI if she used any of the medications from 1 month before to 3 months after conception.