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Stuart

or

Stewart,

royal family that ruled Scotland and England. The Stuart lineage began in a family of hereditary stewards of Scotland, the earliest of whom was Walter (d. 1177), grandson of a Norman adventurer. Several early Stuarts were regents of Scotland, and after Robert, seventh in the hereditary line of stewards, became king as Robert IIRobert II,
1316–90, king of Scotland (1371–90), nephew and successor of David II. He was the first sovereign of the house of Stuart, or Stewart (see Stuart, family), which eventually succeeded to the English as well as the Scottish throne.
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 (1371), the crown remained in the family succession. The marriage of James IVJames IV,
1473–1513, king of Scotland (1488–1513), son and successor of James III. He was an able and popular king, and his reign was one of stability and progress for Scotland.
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 of Scotland to Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII of England, made his granddaughter Mary Queen of ScotsMary Queen of Scots
(Mary Stuart), 1542–87, only child of James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise. Through her grandmother Margaret Tudor, Mary had the strongest claim to the throne of England after the children of Henry VIII.
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 a claimant to the English throne. Mary's claim was recognized when her son, James VI of Scotland, became James IJames I,
1566–1625, king of England (1603–25) and, as James VI, of Scotland (1567–1625). James's reign witnessed the beginnings of English colonization in North America (Jamestown was founded in 1607) and the plantation of Scottish settlers in Ulster.
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 of England in 1603. Charles ICharles I,
1600–1649, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625–49), second son of James I and Anne of Denmark. Early Life

He became heir to the throne on the death of his older brother Henry in 1612 and was made prince of Wales in 1616.
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, son of James I, was beheaded (1649) at the end of the English civil war, but after the interregnum of the Commonwealth and the Protectorate, his son Charles IICharles II,
1630–85, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1660–85), eldest surviving son of Charles I and Henrietta Maria. Early Life

Prince of Wales at the time of the English civil war, Charles was sent (1645) to the W of England with his council,
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 was restored to the throne in 1660. With the deposition (1688) of Charles II's brother and successor, James IIJames II,
1633–1701, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1685–88); second son of Charles I, brother and successor of Charles II. Early Life
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, the crown passed to James's daughter Mary IIMary II,
1662–94, queen of England, wife of William III. The daughter of James II by his first wife, Anne Hyde, she was brought up a Protestant despite her father's adoption of Roman Catholicism. In 1677 she married her cousin William of Orange and went with him to Holland.
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 and her husband, William III, and after them to AnneAnne,
1665–1714, queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1702–7), later queen of Great Britain and Ireland (1707–14), daughter of James II and Anne Hyde; successor to William III.
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, also daughter of James II. In the reign of Anne, the last of the Stuarts to rule England, the crowns of Scotland and England, united personally by the Stuarts, were permanently joined by the Act of Union (1707). After the death of Anne the crown passed (by the Act of SettlementSettlement, Act of,
1701, passed by the English Parliament, to provide that if William III and Princess Anne (later Queen Anne) should die without heirs, the succession to the throne should pass to Sophia, electress of Hanover, granddaughter of James I, and to her heirs, if they
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, 1701) to George IGeorge I
(George Louis), 1660–1727, king of Great Britain and Ireland (1714–27); son of Sophia, electress of Hanover, and great-grandson of James I. He became (1698) elector of Hanover, fought in the War of the Spanish Succession, and in 1714 succeeded Queen Anne
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 of the house of Hanover, son of the Electress SophiaSophia
, 1630–1714, electress of Hanover, consort of Elector Ernest Augustus. She was the daughter of Frederick the Winter King and Elizabeth of Bohemia, who was the daughter of James I of England.
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, who was the granddaughter of James I of England; thus the Hanoverians also had a Stuart claim. The parliamentary rule of succession was adopted because the claim to the throne of the Roman Catholic James II and his descendants, James Francis Edward StuartStuart or Stewart, James Francis Edward,
1688–1766, claimant to the British throne, son of James II and Mary of Modena; called the Old Pretender.
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 (the Old Pretender), Charles Edward StuartStuart or Stewart, Charles Edward,
1720–88, claimant to the British throne, b. Rome. First son of James Francis Edward Stuart (the Old Pretender), he was known as Bonnie Prince Charlie and as the Young Pretender.
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 (the Young Pretender), and Henry StuartStuart or Stewart, Henry Benedict Maria Clement,
known as Cardinal York,
1725–1807, claimant to the British throne, b. Rome.
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 (Cardinal York), was upheld by the JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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. After 1807 this claim passed to the descendants of Henrietta of EnglandHenrietta of England
(Henrietta Anne), 1644–70, duchesse d'Orléans, called Madame; sister-in-law of King Louis XIV of France. The daughter of King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria of England, she was taken (1646) to France when civil war raged in England; in 1661
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, daughter of Charles I. Stuart, the French form of the name, was popularized by Mary Queen of Scots.

Bibliography

See G. Donaldson, Scottish Kings (1967); A. C. Addington, The Royal House of Stuart (2 vol., 1969–71); E. Linklater, The Royal House (1970); G. Perry, The Golden Age Restor'd: The Culture of the Stuart Court (1981).

Stuart

1. the royal house that ruled in Scotland from 1371 to 1714 and in England from 1603 to 1714
2. Charles Edward, called the Young Pretender or Bonnie Prince Charlie. 1720--88, pretender to the British throne. He led the Jacobite Rebellion (1745--46) in an attempt to re-establish the Stuart succession
3. his father, James Francis Edward, called the Old Pretender. 1688--1766, pretender to the British throne; son of James II (James VII of Scotland) and his second wife, Mary of Modena. He made two unsuccessful attempts to realize his claim to the throne (1708; 1715)
www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page74.asp
www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/Greece/Sparta.htm
References in periodicals archive ?
Stu looked up and asked, "Is that the last of the stuffed cabbage?"
From there, Stu ranged the distance to the bear at lust over 40 yards.
In addition to working on a variety of research projects, Stu also played a major role in providing advice to fishery managers.
We prodded a little, and the answer came out: Stu was referring to some type of local government program that sent health care professionals into the homes of terminally ill people who had serious cases of AIDS.
to Launched in August 2013, Stu Brew became one of only 25 environmental and sustainability initiatives in the UK to be awarded funding from the National Union of Students' Student Green Fund.
History of sexual exposure and sex with high risk group (CSW) was noted in both STU as well as non-STU.
Stu, from East Kilbride, was serving with 3rd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment, on September 6, 2006, when he found himself in an unmarked minefield along with several colleagues.
"I have planned out exactly what I'm going to do, each set has a specific theme such as women's names, men's names, colours, animals, TV theme tunes, songs with questions," explains Stu.
Since then, his memory has been kept alive by his mum Celia and the thousands of supporters who had followed the Hexham farmer's plight through his Facebook campaign, Say Strong Stu, which has now raised more than PS200,000 for charity.
The meeting at the House of Commons was streamed live so by speaking up Celia raised the profile of the ongoing Stay Strong Stu fund-raising campaign.
Stu Williams, 45, was left with injuries including a broken nose, and narrowly escaped far worse harm after being stabbed in the base of the spine with an unidentified sharp object.
other stu, something connected with graphic design," he said.