Sue

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Sue

Eugène . original name Marie-Joseph Sue. 1804--57, French novelist, whose works, notably Les mystères de Paris (1842--43) and Le juif errant (1844--45), were among the first to reflect the impact of the industrial revolution on France

Sue

The system language used to write an operating system for the IBM 360. It is a cross between Pascal and XPL. It allows type checked separate compilation of internal procedures using a program library.

["The System Language for Project Sue", B.L. Clark e al, SIGPLAN Notices 6(9):79-88 (Oct 1971)].
References in periodicals archive ?
That includes spending taxpayers' money to sue the churches -- institutions which, among other things, governments at all three levels expect to look after the poor, destitute and psychologically damaged people of Canadian society.
NICARAGUA Government sues tobacco industry in product liability action.
In 1985 the New York Court of Appeals clarified the Ultramares rule by setting forth a legal test (known as the Credit Alliance standard) containing three elements that must be satisfied for a nonclient to be able to sue an accountant for negligent misrepresentation under the near-privity standard:
For one thing, if you sue someone for libel in the U.K., it is the defendant who must prove the truth of what he published.
Regarding early self-termination of services by the client, Sue and Sue (1990) indicated that the termination rate of African American clients after only one counselor/client contact was 50% as compared to 30% for Anglo American clients.
Sue has demonstrated strong personal agency in the face of overwhelming adversity; therefore, her predilection is probably to use primary control strategies despite the fact that a secondary strategy may be the optimal initial choice.
The controversial key to the success of these claims for Y2K-remediation expenses is an obscure property insurance provision known as the "sue and labor" clause, which, as one court more than 75 years ago put it, "is so old that its origin is obscured by antiquity." Basically, the clause stated that insurers would pay for repairs to a sinking ship or for damaged or jettisoned cargo to avoid an even greater insurable loss.
Congress is perfectly capable, when it sees fit, of creating rights for private parties to sue. That's what it did when it banned discrimination in employment and public accommodations in the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Mom and Dad tend to call on Sue, believing her work is less important and demanding than Bill's.
After being asked to help teach conservation at a Pheasants Forever youth event, Sue happened upon a group of enthusiastic hunters.
We must disentangle Sue's character from the problematic narrative point of view which presents her--a point of view primarily Jude's, but buttressed by the narrator's.