sump


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Related to sump: sump pit

sump

1. a receptacle, such as the lower part of the crankcase of an internal-combustion engine, into which liquids, esp lubricants, can drain to form a reservoir
2. Brit dialect a muddy pool or swamp

Sump

Reservoir or pit in the basement of a house into which water can drain, especially during flooding. A sump pump is used to pump collected water out of this reservoir to the sewer pipes.

Sump

 

in mining, an underground working for the collection of surface and subterranean water so that it may be pumped away. The size of the sump is based on the amount of inflow during a period of ten to 12 hours with all drainage pumps shut down. Under emergency flow conditions in a mine, use is made of the additional capacity represented by the workings lying adjacent to the sump and below the pump chamber. The sump is divided by a cofferdam into two sections; when one is in operation, the other is drained.

As places where water accumulates during drainage, sumps are used in mines, subway tunnels, quarries, and elsewhere.

REFERENCE

Burovzryvnye raboty, pogruzka, kreplenie, rudnichnyi ventiliatsiia i vodootliv. Moscow, 1964.

V. A. POLUIANOV


Sump

 

(1) A storage vessel for collecting water that is placed in rock. Where deposits are worked by hydraulic mining, the hydraulic fluid is collected in a sump, for intake and pumping by a soil, coal, or sand pump.

(2) The part of a shaft situated below the level of the shaft bottom (sump or pit).

sump

[səmp]
(engineering)
A pit or tank which receives and temporarily stores drainage at the lowest point of a circulating or drainage system. Also known as sump pit.

sump

1. A pit, tank, basin, or receptacle which receives sewage or liquid waste, located below the normal grade of the gravity system, and which must be emptied by mechanical means.
2. A reservoir sometimes forming part of a roof drain.
3. A depression in a roof deck where the roof drain is located.

sump

i. A low point in an aircraft fuel tank or fuel system where water and other contaminants can collect and be held until they can be drained out. See baffle (i).
ii. A low point in an aircraft engine in which lubricating oil collects and is stored or transferred to an external tank for reuse. See oil sump.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most use l gallon of city water for every 2 gallons of sump water they remove.
The particular grade of Zytel used for the Scania oil sump is a 35% glass-fiber-reinforced, heat-stabilized and lubricated polyamide 66.
The center hole has two grenade sumps and a water sump at the opening of the connecting trench.
While a physical prototype was made of the oil sump, this was done by hand, heating and hammering the steel in order to achieve the shape.
The commission expects sump performance assessments to take into account the full range of possible pipe break sizes, plant-specific compensatory measures and other design features that could reduce clogging.
Although any normal regulator can be used, 'non-sided' regulators such as the Poseidon Cykion have become popular with sump divers since they can be easily used on cylinders mounted on either side of the diver and the regulators can be breathed from in any position.
But in the period this company was running the station there were no routine inspections or maintenance of the sump.
For one machine with an 80 gal sump, the cash saving of five coolant changeouts per year are significant: $400 per year for 20 gal of coolant at $20 per gal; $800 per year for 400 gal of spent coolant disposal at $2 per gal; $400 per year for four man-hours per changeout, or 20 man-hours per year at $20 per man-hour.
The area of altered vegetation around a sump was generally larger in upland or saline environments than in lowland areas.
Wesley the terrier was so tiny he managed to slip through grating which covered a drainage culvert in Monkspath Park, Solihull, then vanished down a sump yesterday afternoon.