SWAPO


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SWAPO

, Swapo
South-West Africa People's Organization
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 6 traces the trajectories of three overlapping groups of people who confronted SWAPO for the abuses committed at Lubango.
In 1960 SWAPO was founded, and launched an armed struggle lasting until the transition to independence in 1989/1990.
Agriculture is followed by tourism, then fishing (largely done by foreign fleets under licence by the SWAPO government), and mining (of gem diamonds, gold, silver, base metals, and the king of them all, uranium; the country's uranium resources, said to be the second largest in the world, account for one-eighth of global production).
Nonetheless, in December 1978, in defiance of the UN proposal, it unilaterally held elections in Namibia that were boycotted by SWAPO and a few other political parties.
For decades, SWAPO was based in refugee camps across the border in Angola.
In April 1989, South Africa acceded to the provisions of Resolution 435, overturning the laws that declared SWAPO a terrorist organization.
SWAPO, To Be Born a Nation, (London; Zed Press, 1981), p.
He also supports SWAPO, South African Peoples Organization, under the leadership of Sam Nujomo.
Pursuant to the treaties Cuba agreed to withdraw all its combat troops from Angola in return for a South African withdrawal from Angola and Namibia, to be followed by UN-supervised elections in Namibia with SWAPO participation.
Born in Cape Town barber's shop in 1960, Namibia's black nationalist movement SWAPO led an unequal armed struggle against South African rule before the ballot box brought it victory.
Toivo Ya Toivo, of Windhoek, Namibia was a founding member of the South West Africa Peoples Organization, known as SWAPO and served as its Secretary General.
This fascinating study presents insights into the realities of the camps under the administration and control of SWAPO of Namibia since the mid 1960s until Independence in 1989/90, at locations in Tanzania (Kongwa), Zambia (the Old Farm, Oshatotwa and Nyango) and Angola (Cassinga and Lubango).