swirl

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swirl

The irregular wood grain pattern that surrounds knots or crotches, esp. found in veneer.
References in periodicals archive ?
WEATHER OR NOT Because the temperature of the water trapped in an eddy often differs substantially from that of the surrounding water, the big swirl can often significantly influence local weather.
Here's an idea - use a wafer and Swirls cream for a neck frill, bananas for the horns, an apple slice for the nose, chocolate buttons for the eyes and sliced fruit gums for teeth.
Low-level perturbation creates a swirl by using two 90 degree elbows, one pipe size smaller than the meter nominal size.
A mission that allows close-to-ground measurements and data collection is the only way to get a solid answer about how the swirls were formed though.
One oddity: The swirls underneath continue to assert themselves more and more each day.
They noticed that most of the areas with unusual magnetic fields and bright swirls are located on exactly the opposite side of the Moon from the most recent impact basins: Orientale, Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Crisium.
And their smaller particles tend to be more susceptible to static electricity, resulting in color swirls. Peroxide cross-linking agents will react with certain organic pigments and cause a large shift in color.
(https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov//4468) NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center  has used information from its (https://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/) Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter , which has been taking images of and data from the Moon since 2009, to explain the swirls that we see on its surface, the most famous of which is called Reiner Gamma.
The new flavor, Banana-Berry Skorton, features chocolate ice cream with banana and raspberry swirls. Making ice cream for special events goes back more than a decade at Cornell.
Her viscous swirls and curlicues are so bold and sweepingly rhythmic that it's an additional source of pleasure to find them rooted in a myriad of microdecisions, in her accretion of a seemingly endless series of small and discrete pictorial globules that proliferate in organic effusion.
Unlike virtually all similar features, this is not simply the halo of a bright crater; rather, it is the Earthward end of a set of bright swirls that extend from the lunar far side.
Computer analysis transforms the stop-action frames into velocities yielding, for the first time, a quantitative portrait of a soap film's swirls, report Michael Rivera of the University of Pittsburgh and Peter Vorobieff and Robert E.