Sabaoth


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Sabaoth

(săb`āŏth, –ōth, sābā`əth), Hebrew term used in the New Testament (Rom. 9.29; James 5.4) and in Christian hymns (e.g., SanctusSanctus
[Lat.,=holy], hymn of the Roman Catholic Mass, beginning, "Holy, holy, holy," from Isa. 6.3; Mat. 21.9. It is the solemn choral ending of the preface. In the old liturgy the second part of the hymn, called Benedictus, was sometimes sung after the elevation.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Te Deum) in the title of God, translated in the Bible as "Lord of Hosts" (Isa. 1.9).
References in periodicals archive ?
Do "metalismo" ao feminismo, da Caverna de Adulao (MG) ao Sabaoth (AC), do pastor death metal Batista (Crash Church) ao mano rapper Jonathan Hibrido (Pingo d'agua), a palavra de ordem (divina) sera sempre: do it yourself--um tributo a saudosa atitude dos punks setentistas.
(16) Nach dem "Apokryphon des Johannes" sind ihre Namen: Athoth, Eloaiou, Astaphaios, Jao, Sabaoth, Adonin, Sabbede (NHC II, 1, 11, 25), nach der Schrift "Vom Urspung der Welt": Jaldabaoth, Jao, Sabaoth, Adonaios, Eloaios, Oraios und Astaphaios (NHC II, 5, 101, 25-30), bei den Ophiten (nach Origenes) Ialdabaoth, Iao, Sabaoth, Adonaios, Astaphaios, Aiolaios, Horaios (Contra Celsum IV 30).
The first being a prayer that God may hear your prayer, despite your unworthiness, then this was followed by a similar prayer to Christ and a chanting of His most sacred names: Alpha and O, El, Eloy, Eloyye, Sithothith, Eon, Sepmelamaton, Ezelophates, Tetragrammaton, Elyoram, Ryon, Deseryon, Erystion, Ysyornus, Onela, Baysyn, Moyn, Messias, Sother, Emanuel, Sabaoth, Adonay ...
The cry of the poor suffering women of India had entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth; His ears were open to the prayer of His servant, the humble missionary, and He disposed the heart of His servant Victoria, our Queen and Governor, to see her, and listen to her tale of their woes and sufferings ...
Licet enim praedecessores nostri ordinationes eorum, qui sine certo titulo promoventur, in iniuriam ordinantium irritas esse voluerint et inanes, nos tamen, benignius agere cupientes, tam diu per ordinatores vel successores eorum provideri volumus ordinatis, donec per eos ecclesiastica beneficia consequantur, ne forte clamore clericorum pauperum, quod in aures Domini Sabaoth credimus introire, indurata facie negligere videamur.
At the conclusion of his novel The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, a demoniac figure "bellow(s) out a terrible formula: "PER ADONAI ELOHIM, ADONAI JEHOVAH, ADONAI SABAOTH, METRATON...."
Tu, Abar, Barbarie, Eloe, Sabaoth, Pachnouphy, Pythipemi, haz que Sextilio, hijo de Dionisia, no concilie el sueno, sino que se queme de amor y deseo por mi, y que su espiritu y corazon se consuman, asi como los miembros del cuerpo entero de Sextilio, hijo de Dionisia.
(50) The Ruethers' translation of the Hebrew word "sabaoth" as "multitudes" is a mistranslation intended to convey the idea that God's "multitudes" refers to the different peoples of the earth.
Las paginas de la Escritura estan tintas de la sangre de los enemigos de Israel, vencidos con la ayuda del dios de los ejercitos, Dominus Deus Sabaoth.
Or that shaving off and cutting away all in her that is dead whether this be idolatry pleasure, error, or lust, I take her to myself clean and pure and beget by her servants for the Lord of the Sabaoth? My efforts promote the advantage of Christ's family, my so-called defilement with an alien increases the number of my fellow servants.
The words are always the same, in number they are only about a dozen, there is no rhyme, there is no poetry: "Hosannah, hosannah, hosannah, Lord God of Sabaoth, 'rah!
A striking aspect of the performances is the vigorous approach to articulation: this works best in those sections of the Magalhaes Mass where the rhythms are unusually active for Portuguese music of this period, and indeed the interpretation of the Mass as a whole is very impressive; in other places the articulation struck me as less convincing and occasionally distracting, particularly where the singers break the sound in the middle of a word (for example, at `Fe|cit potentiam' in Cardoso's Magnificat or `De|us sabaoth' in the Sanctus of Magalhaes's Mass) or breathe in the middle of a sense-unit (as at `Recordata est | Jerusalem' in the Cardoso Lamentations or `resurrectionem | mortuorum' in the Credo of the Mass).