Sabatier, Paul

Sabatier, Paul,

1854–1941, French organic chemist, D.Sc. Collège de France, 1880. He joined the faculty at the Univ. of Toulouse in 1882 and taught there until he retired in 1930. Sabatier was a corecipient of the 1912 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Victor GrignardGrignard, Victor
, 1871–1935, French chemist. He shared the 1912 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Paul Sabatier for his work in organic synthesis based on his discovery (1900) of the Grignard reagent. He taught at the Univ. of Nancy (1909–19) and at the Univ. of Lyons (from 1919).
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 for his method of hydrogenating organic compounds in the presence of finely disintegrated metals, particularly nickel. His work in catalysis laid the groundwork for a number of laboratory syntheses and also led to the development of margarine, hydrogenated oils, and synthetic methanol.

Sabatier, Paul,

1858–1928, French Protestant clergyman and historian; brother of Auguste SabatierSabatier, Auguste
, 1839–1901, French Protestant theologian. He was professor (1867–72) of reformed dogmatics at Strasbourg, and from 1877 until his death he was a member of the Protestant theological faculty of the Sorbonne, Paris.
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. Ill health required his withdrawal from the active ministry, and he went to Assisi, Italy; there he studied the life of St. Francis. His subsequent Life of St. Francis of Assisi (1893) was widely translated and has passed through a number of editions. In 1919, Sabatier became professor of Protestant theology at Strasbourg.

Sabatier, Paul

 

Born Nov. 5, 1854, in Carcassonne; died Aug. 14, 1941, in Toulouse. French chemist. Member of the Paris Academy of Sciences (1913). Sabatier graduated from the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Toulouse in 1877. He was a professor at the University of Toulouse from 1884 to 1930.

Sabatier’s work in hydrogenation catalysis facilitated the formation of the catalytic organic synthesis industry. In 1897, together with J. B. Senderens, he obtained ethane by heating a mixture of ethylene with hydrogen in the presence of a nickel catalyst. In 1909 he carried out the vapor-phase catalytic hydrogénation of crotonic, oleic, and elaidic acids. From 1907 to 1911, working with the French chemist A. Mailhe, Sabatier demonstrated that magnesium, zinc, and cadmium and their oxides cause dehydrogenation of alcohols, whereas the oxides of aluminum, tungsten, and silicon cause dehydration. Subsequently, he also studied catalytic condensation and isomeriza-tion reactions in the presences of oxides and chlorides, catalytic addition and cleavage reactions of hydrogen halides, and the catalytic cracking of heavy hydrocarbons.

Sabatier received a Nobel Prize in 1912.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
Kataliz v organicheskoi khimii. [Leningrad] 1932.

REFERENCES

Kuznetsov, V. I. Razvitie ucheniia o katalize. Moscow, 1964.
Taylor, H. S. “Paul Sabatier.” Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1944, vol. 66, no. 10.
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Sabatier, Paul, Hunter, Susan, & McLaughlin, Susan (1987).