Sacajawea


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Related to Sacajawea: Pocahontas, Sacajawea State Park

Sacajawea

(săk'əjəwē`ə, səkä'–),

Sacagawea

(–gəwē`ə), or

Sakakawea

(–kəwē`ə), c.1788–1812?, Native North American woman who accompanied the Lewis and Clark expeditionLewis and Clark expedition,
1803–6, U.S. expedition that explored the territory of the Louisiana Purchase and the country beyond as far as the Pacific Ocean. Purpose
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, the only woman in the party. She is generally called the Bird Woman in English, although this translation has been challenged, and there has been much dispute about the form of her Native American name and origins. She apparently was a member of the Shoshone, had been captured in a Hidatsa raid and enslaved, and finally was traded to French-Canadian fur trader Toussaint Charbonneau, who referred to her as one of his wives. He was engaged as an interpreter for the expedition, and she proved invaluable as a guide and interpreter when Lewis and Clark reached the upper Missouri River and the mountains from which she had come. On the return journey she and Charbonneau left (1806) the expedition at the Hidatsa-Mandan villages. Some historians date Sacajawea's death around 1812 or 1813; others claim that she was discovered by a missionary in 1875 and died in Wyoming in 1884.

Bibliography

See biography by H. P. Howard (1971).

References in periodicals archive ?
The Forest Service says Sacajawea's bitterroot is only found in central Idaho, growing at elevations from 5,400 feet (1,600 meters) to 9,500 feet (2,900 meters).
Sacajawea did join the group, giving birth to a son on the way.
William Clark served as the doctor on the trail, so William Clark and Sacajawea teamed up a lot, because she was able to show him roots and things that they could use as medication to treat people who got ill along the trail.
Returning to his old haunt, Larry is distraught to learn from Dr McPhee (Gervais) that the old exhibits are being replaced by holographic technology, condemning cowboy Jed (Wilson), Roman emperor Octavius (Coogan) and Native American tracker Sacajawea (Peck) to storage in Washington.
Returning to his old haunt, Larry is distraught to learn from Dr McPhee (Gervais - inset) that the old exhibits are being replaced by state-of-the-art holographic technology, condemning cowboy Jed (Wilson), Roman emperor Octavius (Coogan) and Native American tracker Sacajawea (Peck) to storage in Washington.
And when he gets a call from his tiny pal Jedediah (Owen Wilson) saying he and characters such as Octavius (Steve Coogan) and Sacajawea (Mizuo Peck) are being attacked by the megalomaniacal Pharaoh Kahmunrah (Hank Azaria), Larry rushes to help them.
Returning to his old haunt, Larry is distraught to learn from Dr McPhee (Ricky Gervais) that the old exhibits are being replaced by holographic technology, condemning cowboy Jed (Owen Wilson), Roman emperor Octavius (Steve Coogan) and Native American tracker Sacajawea to storage in Washington.
Cowboy Jedediah (Owen Wilson), Roman emperor Octavius (Steve Coogan), Native American tracker Sacajawea (Mizuo Peck) and Teddy Roosevelt (Robin Williams) are among those at risk.
Discovery Education (www.discoveryeducation.com) and 3M (www.3m.com) has honored Marina Dimitrov (pictured above) from Sacajawea Middle School in Bozeman, MT, with the title of America's Top Young Scientist.
Cowboy Jedediah (Owen Wilson), Roman general Octavius (Steve Coogan), Native American tracker Sacajawea (Mizuo Peck) and Teddy Roosevelt (Robin Williams) are among those at risk.
Scholars have increasingly recognized the young Shoshone woman Sacajawea as a pivotal leader in this expedition.
Roberts, political commentator for ABC News and senior news analyst for National Public Radio, adds to her previous volume Founding Mothers with this book, which traces the contributions of influential American women who shaped the country during the period 1797-1825, such as Abigail Adams, Martha Jefferson, Dolley Madison, Eliza Hamilton, Theodosia Burr, Rebecca Gratz, and Sacajawea. The narrative is based on correspondence, private journals, and other documents that illustrate how these women viewed their husbands and fathers, how they were consulted by them on many matters, and their views of society and the issues of the day.