Sadducee


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Related to Sadducee: Sanhedrin, Pharisee, Syndics

Sadducee

Judaism a member of an ancient Jewish sect that was opposed to the Pharisees, denying the resurrection of the dead, the existence of angels, and the validity of oral tradition
References in periodicals archive ?
What if a spirit or an angel has spoken to him?" When the dissension [most likely between Sadducees and Pharisees] became violent, the tribune, fearing that they would tear Paul to pieces, ordered the soldiers to go down, take him by force, and bring him into the barracks.
Now, Elior has claimed that the 930 scrolls were written by the Sadducees, a group of Jewish priests living in Jerusalem, and that the Essenes did not exist.
Whiteley, `Was John written by a Sadducee?', Aufstieg und Niedergang der Romischen Welt, ed.
Nevertheless, he gives equal weight to the evidence for and against identifying `Qumranites' with Sadducees. In favour is the lack of appeal to legal tradition, certain halakhic disputes between Pharisees and Sadducees (Zadokites?) in the rabbinic literature; against is a statement about resurrection in 4Q521 (`allowing for the possibility that this text may come from a Pharisaic source which happened to be preserved in the Qumran library...') and the even greater points of agreement between Josephus' account of the Essenes and the Qumran literature.
The Sadducee leaders opposed Jesus and the early Christians, and the Pharisees joined in once the antinomian views of Paul became mainstream within the church.
It is therefore only consistent when Sanders radically contests this very tendency, which binds the priestly Sadducees with the Pharisaic priests and laypeople, by answering an unambiguous 'no' to the question of the third chapter, 'Did the Pharisees Eat Ordinary Food in Purity?' (Jewish Law, 131-254).
This continuity, or the resurrection in the beyond, is a theme defended by Jesus and his disciples against the Sadducees who "were eager to bring [in] Grecian culture and thought" [xxxvi].
One of the most important achievements of the revolution that Christ brought to the traditional Jewish faith of His day was to free people from the unbearable load that was placed upon believers by the 'church' of His time -- by the Pharisees and Sadducees, the scribes and priests, that made up the ruling council of the Hebrews, the Sanhedrin.
The high priest Caiaphas is described as "a mongrel smelling blood." The Pharisees and Sadducees are conflated as members of the same evil elite, and Pontius Pilate is a passive and blameless victim of the enraged Jews who force him to kill the Messiah.
Not every Jew at the time shared those views, and the influential faction of the Sadducees even denied the afterlife.
Following the narrative of the first-century historian Josephus, he gives a lot of attention to the different "philosophies" or sects that emerged by the end of the Second Temple period--the Pharisees, Sadducees and Essenes.
I think he'd be horrified upon return to see how much the church hierarchy today resembles the Pharisees and Sadducees of his time!