Saffarid

Saffarid

(sä`färĭd), a dynasty of Sistan that flourished in the 9th cent., ruling (867–1495) in E Persia. Its founder, Yaqub ibn Layth, d. 879?, was a coppersmith who raised an army during a time of unrest and instability, conquering his native province of Sistan by 867. A few years later, he had expanded his rule to include Baluchistan, Fars, Kerman, Sind, and in 873, KhorasanKhorasan
or Khurasan
, region and former province (1991 pop. 6,013,200), c.125,000 sq mi (323,750 sq km), NE Iran. Mashhad is the chief city; other cities include Sabzevar, Bojnurd, and Neyshabur. It is mainly mountainous and arid.
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. However, Yaqub's forces were defeated (876) in an attempt to take BaghdadBaghdad
or Bagdad
, city (1987 pop. 3,841,268), capital of Iraq, central Iraq, on both banks of the Tigris River. The city's principal economic activity is oil refining.
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. Amr ibn Layth, d. 900?, Yaqub's brother and successor, was legitimately recognized by the caliph ruling Baghdad. Amr, the governor of Fars, Isfahan, Khorasan, Sind, and Sistan, was defeated by the SamanidsSamanid
, Muslim Persian dynasty that ruled (819–1005) in Khorasan and Transoxiana as vassals of the Abbasids; founded by Saman-Khuda, of old Persian aristocracy. The Samanids were one of the first purely indigenous dynasties to rule in Persia following the Muslim Arab
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 of Transoxiana in 900. Saffarid governors retained nominal local power until the late 15th cent., despite territorial encroachment by the Ghaznavids and the MongolsMongols
, Asian people, numbering about 6 million and distributed mainly in the Republic of Mongolia, the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of China, and Kalmykia and the Buryat Republic of Russia.
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
Visitors can also explore a treasure trove of 400 silver dirham coins from the Abbasid Caliphate of Iraq, the Samanid dynasty, and the Saffarid dynasty, discovered in Sidamah in 2005.
Highlights of loans from the region include a prehistoric stone tool dating back to 350,000 BCE, a milestone indicating the distance from Makkah in Kufic inscriptions, a funerary stele from Makkah dating back to 700-900 CE (100-300 AH) from the Saudi Commission for Tourism & National Heritage, a collection of over 400 silver Dirhams Coins from the Abbasid Caliphate of Iraq, the Samanid Dynasty and the Saffarid Dynasty discovered in Sidamah (Al Waqba) in 2005 CE (1425 AH) from the National Museum - Sultanate of Oman, and an 8000-year-old two-headed figure from Jordan's Department of Antiquities called Ain Ghazal Statue.
The National Museum of Oman has also made available a collection of over 400 silver dirham coins from the Abbasid Caliphate of Iraq, the Samanid Dynasty and the Saffarid Dynasty, while Jordan's Department of Antiquities has sent an 8,000-year-old, two-headed figure known as the Ain Ghazal Statue.
XVa Mittelasien I Central Asia I (Tubingen: Ernst Wasmuth, 2008); on Saffarid coinage, D.
The most prominent feature ofJondi Shapur from the 9th century onward was the tomb of the founder of Saffarid dynasty, Yaqub bin Layth.
Yaqub-e Layth (reigned 867-79) was a Persian nationalist from Sistan, who by uniting Iranians against the Arab invaders, formed the Saffarid Dynasty.
Modi suggested identifying this figure with the ninth-century founder of the Saffarid dynasty Ya'qub Ibn Layth al-Saffari; see Modi's Jamaspi: Pahlavi, Pazend and Persian Texts (Bombay: Bombay Education Society's Press, 1903), xxxviii--xxxix.
Deborah Tor has argued that Ya'qub the Coppersmith, and the Saffarid dynasty as a whole, lived and breathed for one purpose only, which was performance of holy war against infidels and heretics.
Instead, what he had before him was the example of his contemporaries the Saffarids, who at the time dominated most of the eastern Islamic lands.
Seen from this perspective of the frontiers, the experience of the Tulunids in Egypt was also quite different from that of the Saffarids in Iran and the Aghlabids in North Africa.
Bosworth rejects Zambaur's earlier division of the Saffarid dynasty into four separate dynasties, divided chronologically by the Samanid, Ghaznavid and Mongol invasions.
The importance of the Saffarid dynasty in post-Islamic Persian history lies not so much in its military successes, which were considerable, or in its political achievements, which lacked substance and permanence, as in its symbolic value.