Sagittarius B2

Sagittarius B2

[‚saj·ə′ter·ē·əs ¦bē′tü]
(astronomy)
The richest molecular radio source in the Galaxy, located near the galactic center and consisting of a massive, dense complex of at least seven HII regions and molecular clouds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apponi of the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory in Tucson found vinyl alcohol near the center of the Milky Way in the gas and dust cloud Sagittarius B2. The astrochemists used the 12 Meter Telescope on Kitt Peak near Tucson to detect the molecule's characteristic radio emissions.
They detected the sugar's signature radio emissions in the star-forming region Sagittarius B2 (North), near the center of the Milky Way.
Snyder (University of Illinois) detected four discrete millimeter-wave emissions from [N.sub.2]O while pointing the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's 12-meter antenna toward Sagittarius B2, a giant molecular cloud 25,000 light-years away.
The IRAM 30 m telescope in Spain was used to detect emission from molecules in the star-forming region Sagittarius B2, close to the center of our galaxy.
Scientists have found glycolaldehyde in two other sweet spots in space: the vast cloud of gas called Sagittarius B2, located near the center of the Milky Way; and another region 26,000 light years away from Earth with the highly memorable name of G31.41+0.31.
Known as Sagittarius B2, this extremely cold mass of star-forming gas and dust is located near the center of the Milky Way galaxy.
was made by searching the radio source Sagittarius B2. .
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, known as the ALMA Observatory, a group of radio telescopes funded partially through the National Science Foundation, researchers studied the gaseous star-forming region Sagittarius B2.
In 2000, the researchers detected the molecule in a region of the star-forming cloud Sagittarius B2 that has a temperature of about 50 kelvins.
Also, biomarkers like glycine and sugar-glycolaldehyde have been identified in Sagittarius B2, a dense star-forming cloud of interstellar gas at the heart of Milky Way Galaxy.
The molecules, ethyl formate and n-propyl cyanide, were detected in the star-forming region of space known as Sagittarius B2 and represent two different types of molecule - the esters and alkyl cyanides - which were found in a giant dust cloud at the heart of our galaxy.
The ALMA observatory was used to study Sagittarius B2, a region of the ongoing star formation in the galactic centre of the Milky Way which is where the molecule was discovered.