Sagittarius star cloud


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Sagittarius star cloud

[‚saj·ə′ter·ē·əs ′stär ‚klau̇d]
(astronomy)
A large star cloud within the Milky Way; its extension is about 1500 to 6000 light-years (1.42 × 1019 to 5.68 × 1019 meters) from the sun.
References in periodicals archive ?
Not far from the planet are such deep-sky marvels as the globular cluster M22, below and to the left, at 4[degrees] separation on the 1st, 3[degrees] separation on the 14th, and 2[degrees] separation on the 28th, and the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud (M24) some 4[degrees] to 5[degrees] above.
Above the Teapot, rising like steam from its spout, is the brightest patch of the Milky Way band: the Large Sagittarius Star Cloud.
Under dark skies, the naked eye beholds M24 (the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud) and, just upper right from the Teapot's spout, the Large Sagittarius Star Cloud looking like a puff of steam.
Just off the Teapot's spout, like a puff of steam, is the Large Sagittarius Star Cloud (the brightest part of the photo).
The stars that shine through this hole make up Messier 24, the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud.
There the bulging Sagittarius Star Cloud lies in the direction of the galactic hub, nearly 30,000 light-years away.
The Small Sagittarius Star Cloud (M24) is a 2[degrees]-long swath of Milky Way directly above the Teapot (see page 12).
A window through the Sagittarius-Carina Arm dust allows us to see the 10,000- to 16,000-light-year-distant Small Sagittarius Star Cloud (M24), a star-rich stretch of the Norma Spiral Arm of our galaxy's deep interior.
These marvels include the big open star clusters M6 and M7, near the stinger of Scorpius; the Great Sagittarius Star Cloud, above the spout of the Sagittarius Teapot; and the bright nebulae M8 and M20 (the Lagoon and Trifid) above that.
The Great Sagittarius Star Cloud is the innermost galactic structure that can be observed in visible wave-lengths and the most distant Milky Way structure that can be seen with the unaided eye.