Sagnac effect

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Sagnac effect

[′sän·yäk i‚fekt]
(optics)
The shift in interference fringes from two coherent light beams traveling in opposite directions around a ring when the ring is rotated about an axis perpendicular to the ring.
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Since the phase difference of counterrunning waves caused by the rotation is inversely proportional to the wavelength, it is evident that the Sagnac interferometer sensitivity at radio waves is 107 lower than the sensitivity under the other equal conditions expected in the optical range.
The Sagnac interferometer is based on the Sagnac effect, reported by G.
Let us now assume that the Sagnac interferometer and its light laser beams are in the region of space around the Earth where the gravitational potential is given by equation (3) and let us further assume that the quantum correction to the potential is really negligible.
Let now a Sagnac interferometer be aboard a satellite in a circular polar orbit of inclination i = 90 degrees.
For this last case of the elliptical orbit in (25) and (26) where the Sagnac interferometer is on the satellite and we assume [R.
To attempt increasing the resolution of the phase difference of the Sagnac interferometer let us now propose a Sagnac loop, that has the shape of an ellipse that rotates with an angular velocity [OMEGA].
Let now as before have a Sagnac interferometer be aboard a satellite in a circular polar orbit of inclination i = 90 degrees.