Saint-Nazaire


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Saint-Nazaire

(săN-näzĕr`), city (1990 pop. 66,087), Loire-Atlantique dept., W France, at the mouth of the Loire River on the Bay of Biscay. Saint-Nazaire is an important seaport (mainly for trade with the Antilles and Central America) and a great shipbuilding and industrial center with aeronautical, metallurgical, chemical, and food industries. It is a port for the French navy. Built on the site of an ancient Gallo-Roman town, Saint-Nazaire belonged to the dukes of Brittany in the 14th and 15th cent. A major German submarine base during World War II, Saint-Nazaire was nearly destroyed by Allied bombing.

Saint-Nazaire

a port in NW France, at the mouth of the River Loire: German submarine base in World War II; shipbuilding. Pop.: 65 874 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
On Wednesday, chairman of the Saint-Nazaire Society Nick Beattie travelled from Buckinghamshire for the plaque unveiling in Llandaff.
Sunderland and Saint-Nazaire, a major port and shipbuilding centre on France's Atlantic coast, have been twinned since 1953.
is is the sixth consecutive year that Wearside companies have taken part in the programme for students from Saint-Nazaire, the city's twin town.
Inspired by Saint-Nazaire's recent history of maritime industry, port
Leslie Schuster's study of the ship-building port of Saint-Nazaire, 1880-1910, is something of a throw-back to a spate of labor-history books published on individual cities and towns during the 1970s and 1980s, challenging the applicability of the conclusions of some of them to her case study.
Andrea Klose, press officer for Saint-Nazaire, said, 'In France rugby is traditionally played in the south-western part of the country and Brittany is not exactly identified with that sport.
This study focuses on the adaptation of worker-peasants to shipbuilding employment in Saint-Nazaire after 1881.