Saint-Simonism


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Saint-Simonism

sociopolitical theories advocating industrial socialism. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 955]
See: Utopia
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, the declaration of Saint-Simonism as a religion in 1829 had included a proposal for the solution to the "debilitating division between romanticism and classicism, each of which was held to be a complementary, though partial, expression of the same fundamental truth.
Yet another reason for the hunchback's strength as a critic of Saint-Simonism rests in his reputation as a "popular" figure whose purpose is to educate, as well as to entertain, the very audience that Saint-Simonism hoped to embrace.
It is with Saint-Simonism (a "social" concern with religious and political implications) that we can witness Mayeux being "used" by advocates on both sides of the same argument.
Profession de foi," announced that Le Globe was to become the organ of Saint-Simonism, presenting to its French public scientific, literary, and philosophical works, giving the public enough information so they could make informed decisions.
The first article in Le Corsaire, entitled "Monsieur Mayeux Saint-Simonien," (February 11, 1831) juxtaposes Saint-Simonism with Christianity in direct satirical reference to Saint-Simon's unfinished but posthumously-published Nouveau Christianisme.
Unlike Christianity, Saint-Simonism will freely unite all people and without sacrificing science, art and industry.
Saint-Simonism was the only group other than the Republicans to which Mayeux was directly linked in art or literature.
Le Siecle was a Protestant publication, and as could be expected, decried Saint-Simonism as a religion.
Mill regarded Saint-Simonism by the late 1840s as 'defunct as a system' but still important for having 'sowed the seeds of nearly all the Socialist tendencies which have since spread so widely in France'.
In Fourier's scheme democracy seemed more conspicuous than in Owenism and Saint-Simonism for the sharp division between management, however rational and benevolent, and ordinary membership had been overcome.
Kolakowski notes that 'Of all the pre-Marxist doctrines Saint-Simonism had the strongest effect in diffusing socialist ideas among the educated classes' (192).
For Mill's fuller comments on Saint-Simonism during this period see Collected Works, XXIII, 401-3, 509-11, 674-80, 689-91.