Saito Makoto

Saito Makoto

 

Born Oct. 27, 1858, in Mitsusawa; died Feb. 26, 1936, in Tokyo. Japanese statesman, military figure, and admiral (1916).

Saito was minister for the navy in 1913 and 1914. From 1919 to 1927 and from 1929 to 1931 he was governor-general of Korea. In 1927 he was the chief Japanese representative at the Geneva Naval Limitation Conference. Serving as prime minister from 1932 to 1934, Saito accelerated the colonization of the northeastern provinces of China, which Japan had seized, and the preparations for aggression in central China. Saito’s government carried out a policy of suppression of democratic and an-timilitary movements in the country. In 1932 and 1933 the government carried out mass arrests of Communists and activists in left-wing trade unions and other progressive organizations. Saito was assassinated during a fascist military putsch.

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89) and navigating his desk through the treacherous hallways of the naval and civilian bureaucracies ashore, The protege of Prime Ministerial Admirals Saito Makoto and Kato Tomosaburo, Nomura's finest hours came at the Washington naval conference in 1921-22 where he served as senior aide to Kato Tomosaburo, who as Navy Minister was responsible for getting the Japanese government to agree to the Washington system of naval arms limitation which was aimed at bringing peace to the Pacific and stability to East Asia (p.
Nanami found the use of robotics and animatronics very interesting and coined the phrase "Robo-Willy." Although the Nagoya Aquarium officials never acknowledged the value of the Robo-Willy concept, Nagoya City Councilmember Saito Makoto has worked diligently to stop the orca captivity at Nagoya and expressed interest in the new high-tech concept of using robotics.