Saksin

Saksin

 

a major trading city at the mouth of the Volga River, mentioned by Arab geographers of the tenth through the 14th century. Its exact location is unknown. Some scholars believe that it is the same city as Itil’, mentioned earlier in ancient sources. Others believe that it was located on the site of Sarai-Batu or Sarai-Berke.

References in periodicals archive ?
YUh 2.5); for persons appearing in court: arthin ('plaintiff') and pratyarthin ('defendant'), saksin ('witness', no.
In other words, with my thesis I point to the existence of a transcendent gaze--one may call it the gaze of a disinterested subject, or that of the witnessing self (saksin)--through which one ascends by the erasure of one's culturally constructed self as one thereby enters the condition of the relational self that emerges in the binary of being-with-other.
dpang or dpang po is a common translation for saksin, "witness," and dang bcas pa - like can - is a good translation for the Sanskrit suffix -mat, "having," "possessing." Although Gunaprabha is here again of little use, having - as we will see - constructed his text differently, still saksimat, "having a witness," "witnessed," or "attested," is itself widely attested in dharmasastra in connection with documents.