Salado formation

Salado formation

[sə′lä·dō fȯr‚mā·shən]
(geology)
A red-bed formation from the Permian found in southeast New Mexico; contains rock salt and potash salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The salt is part of the Salado Formation salt beds which were formed 225 million years ago.
The Salado Formation, or main salt, consists of thick halite intervals interbedded with anhydrite, polyhalite, and siltstone.
Hendrickson and Jones (1953) and Maley and Huffington (1963) noted the relationship between thinning in the Salado Formation and development of sinks in southeastern New Mexico.
The Salado Formation, or main salt, consists of thick halite intervals with interbedded anhydrite, siltstone and polyhalite.
A comparison of the structure map on the Salado Formation (Fig.
For example, Figure 5 reveals a dissolution area in the Rustler Formation located below the surficial location of Cedar Lake Draw, but a corresponding dissolution area is not indicated in the underlying Salado Formation. This dissimilarity, coupled with the lack of sagging of the Rustler Formation over the Salado Formation, and the thickening of the Salado Formation beneath the Cedar Lake Draw area indicates there is no correlation between thinning in the Salado Formation and formation of Cedar Lake Draw (Howard, 1985).
WIPP is located a half-mile below the Earth in the massive Permian age salts of the Salado Formation within the Delaware Basin that cuts across southeastern New Mexico into west Texas.