load

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load

1. the weight that is carried by a structure
2. Electrical engineering Electronics
a. a device that receives or dissipates the power from an amplifier, oscillator, generator, or some other source of signals
b. the power delivered by a machine, generator, circuit, etc.
3. the force acting on a component in a mechanism or structure
4. the resistance overcome by an engine or motor when it is driving a machine, etc.
5. an external force applied to a component or mechanism

Load

The demand upon the operating resources of a system. In the case of energy loads in buildings, the word generally refers to heating, cooling, and electrical loads.

Load

 

in electrical engineering, the electric power delivered by a power source to a power user. If variations in voltage are small, load can be characterized by magnitude of current. The term “load” is also often applied to the device consuming the electric power—that is, to a piece of equipment, such as a motor or a lighting device.

All loads in DC circuits are resistive loads; loads in AC circuits, however, may be resistive or reactive. A resistive load is expressed as the power used, for example, to produce heat or to do mechanical work (as in a heating or lighting device). A reactive load reflects the exchange of energy between the source and the power-consuming device—for example, between a power system and the primary winding of a transformer operating at no load.

load

[lōd]
(computer science)
To place data into an internal register under program control.
To place a program from external storage into central memory under operator (or program) control, particularly when loading the first program into an otherwise empty computer.
An instruction, or operator control button, which causes the computer to initiate the load action.
The amount of work scheduled on a computer system, usually expressed in hours of work.
(electricity)
A device that consumes electric power.
The amount of electric power that is drawn from a power line, generator, or other power source.
The material to be heated by an induction heater or dielectric heater. Also known as work.
(electronics)
The device that receives the useful signal output of an amplifier, oscillator, or other signal source.
(engineering)
To place ammunition in a gun, bombs on an airplane, explosives in a missile or borehole, fuel in a fuel tank, cargo or passengers into a vehicle, and the like.
The quantity of gas delivered or required at any particular point on a gas supply system; develops primarily at gas-consuming equipment.
(mechanics)
The weight that is supported by a structure.
Mechanical force that is applied to a body.
The burden placed on any machine, measured by units such as horsepower, kilowatts, or tons.
(mining engineering)
Unit of weight of ore used in the South African diamond mines; equal to 1600 pounds (725 kilograms); the equivalent of about 16 cubic feet (0.453 cubic meter) of broken ore.

load

1. A force, or system of forces, carried by a structure, or a part of the structure.
2. Any device or piece of electric equipment that receives electric power.
3. The power delivered to such a device or piece of equipment.
4. The amount of heat per unit time imposed on a refrigeration system; the required rate of heat removal.

load

load
Relationship between load classification number and load classification group.
The total weight of passengers and/or freight carried on board an aircraft.

load

(1)
To copy data (often program code to be run) into memory, possibly parsing it somehow in the process. E.g. "WordPerfect can't load this RTF file - are you sure it didn't get corrupted in the download?" Opposite of save.

load

(2)
The degree to which a computer, network, or other resource is used, sometimes expressed as a percentage of the maximum available. E.g. "What kind of CPU load does that program give?", "The network's constantly running at 100% load". Sometimes used, by extension, to mean "to increase the level of use of a resource". E.g. "Loading a spreadsheet really loads the CPU". See also: load balancing.

load

(3)
To install a piece of software onto a system. E.g. "The computer guy is gonna come load Excel on my laptop for me". This usage is widely considered to be incorrect.

load

(1) To copy a program from a storage drive or the network into RAM for execution. In the early days, programs were loaded first and then run. Today, when referring to applications, loading implies load and run. The phrases "load the app," "run the app," "launch the app" and "open the app" are all used synonymously.

People often use the term erroneously to refer to installations; therefore, "load the program" may also mean "install the program." See install program and open.

(2) To copy data or programs onto a drive.

(3) To insert a removable cartridge into a drive.

(4) To insert a flash drive into a USB port.

(5) In programming, to store data in a register.

(6) In performance measurement, the current use of a system as a percentage of total capacity.

(7) The flow of current through a circuit. The load is the amount of power used by electrical and electronic equipment.

(8) The volume of traffic in a network.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, you will avoid a sales fee when investing in no-load mutual funds.
Sequeira notes how the new regulations such as the reduced hotel sales fees are aligned with the goal of increasing traffic into the country.
Franchise owners are required to pay 8 percent in sales fees as well as a $20,000 initial franchising fee to Garlic Jim's.
The private law enforcement officers expect to collect by the end of 2012 over BGN 1 B from indebted businesses, meaning only BGN 100A 000 will enter State coffers in the form sales fees and Value Added Tax, VAT.
They needed to earn a return large enough to pay the sales fees and other expenses, return the principal amount to consumers and earn a profit.
The new law stipulates that fund sales fees should not exceed 3 percent of paid-in capital and service fees should not surpass 1.5 percent of the fund's asset in order to curb excessive fees taken by fund management companies and to protect investors.
The C4C program operates thanks to real estate firms and brokers teaming to designate a percentage of their rental and sales fees to support The Catalog's member organizations--organizations that strive to better the lives of youth whose lives are impacted by poverty, crime, drugs and violence.
The value of its housing stock up for sale has also increased to pounds 60m, representing potential sales fees of pounds 1m.
The value of their housing stock up for sale has also increased to pounds 60m, representing potential sales fees of pounds 1m.
Bottleauction.co.uk will work closely with these clubs, offering a share of the commission by way of a 10% rebate of the net sales fees each month.
A modest $1,000 minimum investment, or any larger multiple of that amount, can serve a variety of savings needs, and there are no sales fees or Charges."
formulary management and drug-switch programs, educational support, claims processing and pharmacy network fees that are charged from retail pharmacies, and data sales fees." The PBM trade group Pharmaceutical Care Management Association (PCMA) sued Maine when it enacted the law in 2003, claiming that it overstepped federal, state, and contract boundaries.